[Weekly Drip 055.1] Elixir is fast, webasm has an IDE, Technical Debt payment strategy

News

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Mozilla let everyone in on a sneak peek at WebAssembly Studio, and it did NOT disappoint. Work started on the Web Assembly IDE the end of last year as an attempt to merge WasmExplorer and WasmFiddle. The IDE will start off with support for C, C++ and Rust. Some features include editable compiler artifacts and seeing how code is represented at a binary level. If you’re excited, watch this 20 minute demo of the beta.

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Neil Menee builds an argument for Elixir with a side by side comparison to Python, in his piece ‘Yet another Why my company chose Elixir story’. The load test response time was much more favorable with Elixir/Phoenix than Python with Django or Falcon. “Come for the OTP”, and “Stay for the velocity”.

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Instead of ignoring it, Bill Clark not only seeks technical debt, but wants to understand and fix it. Bill provides a solid definition of technical debt: code or data that future developers will pay a cost for. Bill argues impact, fix cost and contagion determine when or if technical debt will be dealt with. It’s great that technical debt is becoming a hot topic on engineering blogs, I would love to see more articles as detailed as Bill’s ‘A Taxonomy of Tech Debt’. If this tech debt article doesn’t put out the burning gaming engineering fire inside, follow it up with Michael Allar’s ‘Confessions of an Unreal Engine 4 Engineering Firefighter’.

Work From Home (WFH) isn’t for everyone, but it probably would be a perfect fit for most people. More and more studies are coming out that show a boost in productivity when working remotely. Whether you WFH or in an office, you likely value productivity, which Sam Altman has a solid write up on. Some of his tips include buying a nice mattress, having natural light, and scheduling most meetings to be 15-20 min instead of defaulting to 1 hour.

Data Science is cool. It’s even cooler when you can learn it online for free with Berkeley. Berkeley boasts that its** ‘Foundations of data Science’ is the fastest growing course in the Berkeley catalog.** The course covers things like statistical inferences and visualizing distributions using popular data sets. Sign up for free on Edx. Also, you can start popping off your data visualization skills with this free D3.js course on scrimba.

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When developing ‘=’ means assignment, but why? Hillel Wayne goes into the history of this question, and he gives a more detailed answer than ‘Because of C’. If you are not familiar with ‘The Big Four’ (or if you are) checkout out Hillel’s write up.

Dregs

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https://twitter.com/dsyme/status/983297146379259905?s=19

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