The DailyDrip Weekly

Weekly news updates on all the coolest stuff in software development, from DailyDrip.

[2018-05-18] [Weekly Drip 060.1] Front-End Tooling Survey, VIM Pacman, Agile & Estimation don’t get love.

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What happens when you combine Create React App, Rails 5 & Heroku? A Rock Solid Modern Web Stack, that’s what. Also, Charlie Gleason has already done it, and has a step by step tutorial on how you can do it too.

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Finally, a tool to learn Vim based off the legendary Pacman game. Introducing PacVim, a game in the CLI to help you learn Vim. There is a normal and hard mode, and the game is played like PacMan. No surprise there. Another cool game we saw this week combines programming and AI, check it out as well.

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The Front-End Tooling Survey results are in. 5,000+ developers took part in the 24 question survey. Almost 90% of respondents said they had intermediate or above in knowledge of CSS. 34% said they most frequently use Bootstrap, and 49% use a CSS naming scheme.

Fuse **has been made Open Source**. The iOS and Android UX and app building toolset includes all of Fuse’s previously paid tools and extensions.

JavaScript gets a lot of hate, and though some reasons may be viable there are definitely some good parts. Ash Furrow dives into the good parts of JavaScript, which he argues are the community, syntax, and tool chains. Read more on why JavaScript, is Good Actually.

A neat video on ‘Efficient data loading in Elixir using the deferrable pattern’. This is super helpful if you are interested in making GraphQL resolvers fast!

The earlier you focus on code being readable, the better. Tef writes in his piece ‘Write code that’s easy to delete, and easy to debug too’. Tef provides a couple rules to go buy like 1. The computer is always on fire, and 2. “Your program is at war with itself.”

In Developers Should Abandon Agile Ron Jeffries argues that most Agile frameworks are detrimental to the software development process, and have strayed far from the original Agile Manifesto. He suggest using Extreme Programming, but in the absence of that focussing on what is next and delivering completed code over long term planning.

In **Stop Pretending Development Is Certain!** Scott Nimrod and Jayme Edwards discuss the perils of estimation and why we, as an industry, need to re-examine our approach to development.

The Rust compiler is faster than ever, with improvements of 1.06-4x faster compile times in the last month. These updates are already in the nightly builds, and are expected to hit wider release channels over the next few months.

Build your own explores how to DIY projects like Docker, Git or an OS. This is a neat resource if you want to figure out how something works at a deep level.

Philippe Creux covers Aggregates, Calculators, Reactors and more while tackling the simple question what is Event Sourcing? In Philippe’s piece ‘Event Sourcing made Simple’, you can expect to have quite the understanding of Event Sourcing in a simple way.

Yash Thakur discusses everything you need to know about Proxies, a new JavaScript ES6 feature. Yash shows that Proxies allow you to intercept and customise operations performed on objects. From what a Proxy is to the syntax and common object behaviour, Yash covers it all to get you up to speed.

While most of us only use a handful of HTML Headers in everyday development, Andrew Betts has gone through which HTTP headers are useful and which aren't. Be sure to check the comments, as the discussion around why some headers are no longer useful is thought provoking.

Charlee Li has compiled a list of the eleven best fonts for programming. We recently had a long discussion about font selection for usage. We liked Source Code Pro and Anonymous Pro the best.

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http://www.monkeyuser.com/2018/code-reuse/

Today's issue of Inside Dev was hand-crafted for you by the team at www.DailyDrip.com, where you can get daily videos on emerging software development tools, techniques, and patterns.

Previously

[2018-05-11] [Weekly Drip 059.1] Google IO & PyCon Do Not Disappoint, DIY Pool Table (With JavaScript) & Cool Stuff in FireFox 60

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This week we saw Google IO 2018. The most contentious demo was Google Duplex pretending to be a human when it makes appointments for you. Flutter saw some nice talks. If you build Android apps, you’ll be interested in checking out Android Jetpack. Also, Android Things officially released version 1.0. Read all of the updates on techradar or take a look at Google’s official recap. P.S. In light of Duplex, if you haven’t read Daniel Suarez’ Daemon you should.

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PyCon 2018 is rolling as well! Checkout Christy Heaton’s talk on Spatial Analysis or Nicholas Tollervey’s talk on How to Make a Kids’ Code Editor. You can see the talks available, but they haven’t uploaded them all yet. The conference goes through Sunday, so if you’re in Cleveland, go to it!

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Potch on Mozilla Hacks wrote up on some new features in Firefox 60 that include ES Modules, text-stroke, and a Web Authentication API. Read the full article. There is also some good stuff about cookies and ESR in there.

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Chen Shmilovich made a very nice looking Pool game with JS and HTML5. Chen dives into how to center game images, how to position the mouse, and the mechanics of the Pool stick. Watch a demo of the game, a tutorial of how to build it, or check out the code.

Dregs

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Today's issue of Inside Dev was hand-crafted for you by the team at www.DailyDrip.com, where you can get daily videos on emerging software development tools, techniques, and patterns.

[2018-05-04] [Weekly Drip 058.1] Is C stifling processor development? Kubernetes gets Operators. A new Electron challenger has appeared!

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David Chisnall writes an insightful piece on how C Is Not a Low-level Language. It’s the story of how our processor designs are stifled because C/C++ developers really want to pretend they’re still programming a PDP-11. Some properties of C programs hold back potentially powerful new architectures (C programs tend to have few busy threads), and C itself is preprocessed to appear simple in an increasingly complicated world. Perhaps we should abandon it just to get a fresh perspective on this whole software thing :) People will continue to build processors to run existing C code faster, which means future code will be built for processors like today’s processors, which is an awful cycle that we could break if we wanted to. Also if you enjoy contention you’ll like the comments.

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CoreOS released The Operator Framework: an open source toolkit designed to manage Kubernetes native applications, called Operators, in a more effective, automated, and scalable way. In essence, Operators encode ops-knowledge around a particular service, automated inside of Kubernetes. Think “scaling and managing a Solr cluster” as an example of something that could become a fundamental feature of your cluster, rather than something you construct manually using primitives. This is a huge step forward in easing the burden of complex applications, and I’m eager to see where this framework takes us.

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Who is ready to replace Electron? Check out Proton Native, a new way to make native desktop applications with a syntax similar to React Native. Proton Native works with Redux, is cross platform, and did we mention you don’t have to use Electron? Take a look at the announcement, the code, and how to get started. (ed - I’m shorting RAM manufacturer stock)

The country of France seized france.com from its owner who was operating a legitimate travel site since 1994. Ars Technica details the legal battle and his counter suite. Why is this in a dev newsletter? Because it’s a good reminder to make sure you trust your upstream partners, including hosts, DNS providers, registrars, package maintainers, etc. In this case Web.com caved to France’s lawsuit, despite having no authority to release the domain from its owner.

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Swizec Teller dives into why a CS degree is useful for engineers, but not mandatory. It’s valuable to learn the the principles of computer science. Whether you learn them through school or independent study is up to you. Typically people that get a computer science degree aren’t disappointed. Swizec leaves his readers with a solid quote, It’s about knowing enough to know what to ask.

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Tom Black shows you how to compile Ruby to WebAssembly. In general, mruby can target LLVM, which can target WebAssembly, and so it’s possible to write ruby that will compile to webasm. It takes advantage of something called Binaryen, which aims to help compile to webassembly. Even if you don’t care about Ruby, if you want to do anything similar you will learn about valuable tools in this article. He also released the wasm gem to get started playing with this stuff quickly.

Dregs

Today's issue of Inside Dev was hand-crafted for you by the team at www.DailyDrip.com, where you can get daily videos on emerging software development tools, techniques, and patterns.

[2018-04-20] [Weekly Drip 056.1] Rails Conf, 1000+ Rails Projects, Azure Sphere & Avoid Fireballs

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Rails Conf 2018 just wrapped up in Pittsburgh. Rails Conf tweeted that the videos will be uploaded to ConFreaks within a month. Talks featured High output engineering, a lot of RSpec, Eileen Uchitelle presenting on ‘The Future of Rails 6, and of course DHH.

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David Foster taught me how to avoid fireballs and drive a race car using ‘Hallucinogenic Deep Reinforcement Learning’. David provides a step by step guide on how he did it using Python and Keras. Avoiding fireballs may not be on the latest resume recommendations, but it is a crucial skill! Seriously though, this is a fun piece.

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What do you get when combine 1000+ Ruby on Rails projects? A lot of errors. You probably don’t need to know about every single error. However, Rollbar went to the trouble to find the top 10 errors. The top three errors are 1. Routing Error 2. Undefined Method 3. Invalid Authenticity Token. The article also dives into how to avoid each error, thanks Rollbar!

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CSS Grid is the future. It’s time to start learning it. Manuel Matuzovic details how the ‘grid’ shortcut works, why ‘grid’ is better than ‘grid-template’ and how to handle implicit rows and columns. Manuel provides codepen examples on sticky footers and automatic minimum size of grid items.

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The new Hyper terminal is here, Hyper 2.0. New features include a Canvas based rendering engine (which fixes their speed issues), a catalog of plugins and themes, and better support for keymaps and hyperlinks. It’s still an electron app, but it also still looks really cool. It also is no longer powered by hterm, but instead it is using xterm.js 3.0.

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Microsoft announced a new IoT OS that is a customized linux kernel. The new OS is called Azure Sphere. Read the official announcement, Tech Crunch’s write up or watch this nifty youtube video announcement Microsoft made.

Dregs

alt text https://twitter.com/alexsnaps/status/968616341140918273

Today's issue of Inside Dev was hand-crafted for you by the team at www.DailyDrip.com, where you can get daily videos on emerging software development tools, techniques, and patterns.

[2018-04-13] [Weekly Drip 055.1] Elixir is fast, webasm has an IDE, Technical Debt payment strategy

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Mozilla let everyone in on a sneak peek at WebAssembly Studio, and it did NOT disappoint. Work started on the Web Assembly IDE the end of last year as an attempt to merge WasmExplorer and WasmFiddle. The IDE will start off with support for C, C++ and Rust. Some features include editable compiler artifacts and seeing how code is represented at a binary level. If you’re excited, watch this 20 minute demo of the beta.

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Neil Menee builds an argument for Elixir with a side by side comparison to Python, in his piece ‘Yet another Why my company chose Elixir story’. The load test response time was much more favorable with Elixir/Phoenix than Python with Django or Falcon. “Come for the OTP”, and “Stay for the velocity”.

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Instead of ignoring it, Bill Clark not only seeks technical debt, but wants to understand and fix it. Bill provides a solid definition of technical debt: code or data that future developers will pay a cost for. Bill argues impact, fix cost and contagion determine when or if technical debt will be dealt with. It’s great that technical debt is becoming a hot topic on engineering blogs, I would love to see more articles as detailed as Bill’s ‘A Taxonomy of Tech Debt’. If this tech debt article doesn’t put out the burning gaming engineering fire inside, follow it up with Michael Allar’s ‘Confessions of an Unreal Engine 4 Engineering Firefighter’.

Work From Home (WFH) isn’t for everyone, but it probably would be a perfect fit for most people. More and more studies are coming out that show a boost in productivity when working remotely. Whether you WFH or in an office, you likely value productivity, which Sam Altman has a solid write up on. Some of his tips include buying a nice mattress, having natural light, and scheduling most meetings to be 15-20 min instead of defaulting to 1 hour.

Data Science is cool. It’s even cooler when you can learn it online for free with Berkeley. Berkeley boasts that its** ‘Foundations of data Science’ is the fastest growing course in the Berkeley catalog.** The course covers things like statistical inferences and visualizing distributions using popular data sets. Sign up for free on Edx. Also, you can start popping off your data visualization skills with this free D3.js course on scrimba.

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When developing ‘=’ means assignment, but why? Hillel Wayne goes into the history of this question, and he gives a more detailed answer than ‘Because of C’. If you are not familiar with ‘The Big Four’ (or if you are) checkout out Hillel’s write up.

Dregs

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https://twitter.com/dsyme/status/983297146379259905?s=19

Today's issue of Inside Dev was hand-crafted for you by the team at www.DailyDrip.com, where you can get daily videos on emerging software development tools, techniques, and patterns.

[2018-04-06] [Weekly Drip 054.1] Rogue Packages, Rust Week, & A Guide to the Unexpected!

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Rogue packages are a danger to anyone using JavaScript projects such as Webpack and Babel. Casper Beyer argues that developers shouldn’t just trust package managers, but consider other possibilities instead of relying on trivial packages such as an is-true or is-even package. Using tons of packages to do trivial things creates a large surface area that could be exploited by rogue package maintainers in the future.

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Is your system prepared to deal with the unexpected? Fred Hebert discusses how to make a system which deals with fault tolerance with Elixir. Fred’s talk, The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Unexpected, was given at ElixirDaze and CodeBEAMSF, and you can watch it on Youtube.

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Netflix announced its newly released Open Source project, FlameScope. FlameScope aims to provide performance visualization insights such as analyzing variance and perturbations via a flame graph. The full announcement covers what a flame graph is with plenty of examples and gives you all the steps to get started. It also covers running FlameScope locally, so you can start monitoring your CPU’s performance visually. Check out the code on GitHub or watch a video of FlameScope in action.

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If you would like to develop, test, and deploy your code from one spot, Fly Edge Apps is for you. Fly.io announced the release of Edge Apps, which are particularly good at optimizing images, remixing content, and not being a CDN. Edge Apps also help pre-render React apps, and can be set up with existing React apps easily (12 lines of code or less easy).

Been hearing about PWAs, but haven’t heard enough to learn about them yet? Maximiliano Firtman has you covered. Maximiliano covers some history of the PWA, and he hypes some news Apple silently slipped into its latest iOS update: PWAs are on iOS. Maximiliano also covers the differences between PWAs on Android and iOS along with other PWA limitations.

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Adnan Ahmed made a 24 step roadmap for modern Backend developers. Adnan notes this roadmap has more direction than the typical one that just has a list of technologies. If you are a true beginner, start at step one obviously. However, even if you have been involved in BE for a while, this might serve as a good way to judge your strengths and weaknesses.

Will Crichton argues that ‘program models transition over time’ and titles this process ‘Gradual Programming’. Will discusses which problems will impact the next generation of programmers the most and the current failings of languages used in research. Dive into the piece ‘Gradual Programming’, and then follow it up with some juicy orange site discussion on the topic.

Dregs

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https://twitter.com/SusanPotter/status/980490436459540480?s=19

Today's issue of Inside Dev was hand-crafted for you by the team at www.DailyDrip.com, where you can get daily videos on emerging software development tools, techniques, and patterns.

[2018-03-30] [Weekly Drip 053.1] *Intelligent* DEs, Code Under Change, and Developers are ….

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Maybe using a copyright protected language without asking first wasn’t a great idea. Google is likely going to owe Oracle a lot of money. An appeals court declared Google using Java for Android in 2009 was a violation of copyright law. Oracle is asking for about $9 billion in damages.

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Unity released all of the C# source code on the engine and editor. Check out the Unity C# reference source code. This was a major announcement made at GDC 2018. There was a lot of other cool stuff at GDC this year too, especially if you are an Epic Games (Fortnight creators) fan. Here’s a list of all the presentations.

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WebAssembly Studio, an IDE that runs in the browser and specifically targets WebAssembly as an output, is now in beta. Run it locally on your machine, or see it live at https://webassembly.studio/.

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While you’re reimagining what an IDE can be, you might want to check out Github Explorer, where Jane Street’s James Somers challenges developers to imagine an emacs-based IDE with advanced Git integration. James argues that a Github Explorer could help you get in and out of code review quickly, among many more things. This is an exposition of one of Jane Street’s internal tools that looks fantastic.

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Jessica Kerr wrote a great piece about code under change. She uses a mid-change system she’s working on as an example upon which she lays some wisdom: if you don’t understand the context of code, ask about it before you judge it. Similarly, if you do understand the context of a system that’s mid-change, appreciate that to a newcomer it can be extremely confusing.

What happens when you type ‘programmers are’ into Google? One redditor found the top results to be: [not engineers, easily scared, arrogant, lazy]. This sparked quite the conversation on reddit. Why does Google hate us?

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Per Harald Borgen explains ‘How to make responsiveness super simple with CSS Variables’. In his tutorial you will quickly get a simple webpage to be responsive by rearranging, moving and scaling with CSS Variables. The big takeaway is that CSS Variables allow you to change fundamentally reusable values based on the viewport size, which simplifies many tasks. Using this strategy will simplify your frontend life.

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Ionic released the alpha for a new OSS projected called Capacitor. It is essentially an alternative to Cordova, which seems reasonable. Some features of Capacitor include support for PWAs, a simple plugin model, and a standard library of native features. Top goals in the roadmap include improving support for Electron and Ionic Pro. Check out the the GitHub Repo, or read the full announcement.

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Who else would you rather get some tips on developing in Ruby than Mr. Yukihiro Matz Matsumoto? Matz and some other top Ruby pros give 10 key points of Ruby Development with the SideCI team. If you are interested in things like Ruby 3.0, JIT performance, Ruby’s competitors, or have just programmed in Ruby before, this will be a fun read.

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Robert O'Callahan is at it again, but this time he is speeding up ‘dwarfdump’. How you might ask? With Rust. Robert was able to reduce the dump time by 480 seconds. Robert credited Rust’s fearless parallelism as a huge help, as well as fixing a couple other smaller issues.

If you have had some headaches from managing side effects in Redux, you are not alone. Check out redux-commander, and worry no more about side effects and async actions in Redux. Scroll through the GitHub repo to see a simple and declarative syntax, which will help command your Redux headaches. It feels elm-y to me, which is my way of saying looks good. If you are tired of hearing Redux is overused, you hear a counter argument as well by a Redux maintainer on Mark’s Dev Blog.

Twitter Was Too Good

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Dregs

alt text https://twitter.com/dnvtrn/status/977279824438943744?s=19

[2018-03-23] [Weekly Drip 052.1] Technical debt as a tool, the CLOUD Act, Github ‘forks’, and toilet geolocation

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A wise bear once said, Only you can prevent forest fires. Fagner Brack is taking this a step further, by arguing that technical debt is a way code is finished faster, but will require refactoring later to be optimal. Also, Fagner wisely states, “only you can work out ways to reduce the interest to be paid.” If you are comfortable with spaghetti code this fierce challenge of an article is not for you. Fagner dives into deeper topics like “why duplication is better than wrong abstraction”, and argues if your team is aligned you can use technical debt to your favor, but perhaps not advantage.

A sneaky little disaster called the Cloud Act got rolled into the omnibus spending bill, which passed. This means bad news for communications privacy. The CLOUD Act is basically a backdoor around the fourth amendment, which allows police at home and abroad to seize cross-border data without following the privacy rules where the data is stored. Things like emails, chat logs, and anything else online can now be seized without court orders. There will be developer fall out on this issue to make data available.

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Have you ever gone back to one of your forked repositories just to find out it has been disabled? Niels-Ole Kühl’s piece ‘A fork on Github is no fork’, discusses his experience of this happening. Evidently, GitHub can block you from your own repos that have been forked. Even if your account has access to unlimited private repos, you could still fall prey to this scenario.

Microsoft Azure and Amazon Web Services are two of the top dogs for data services. However, which one is better? Thomas LaRock does a side by side comparison, which serves as at least a starter guide for the research you might need when deciding between the two. Whether you need Cosmos DB, DynamoDB, or a specific type of cache, Thomas compares each service’s offerings for these and more. He also includes a dandy cost comparison for some of the different services offered in a follow up post. I would love to see a follow up from Thomas covering Google Cloud’s Datastore!

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You use google analytics, and you probably use slack. So, why not combine the two by building a GA slack bot with Python? In Greg Schwartz tutorial on Twilio, he does just this. Greg will take you all the way to a completed GA slack bot. You’ll start with exactly what you’ll need to get the project set up, create some nifty slack commands that will display some weekly metrics from GA, and then even add some fun graphs.

Burnout is real, and those pesky OSS maintainers should really consider helping out with my specific issue, or I might burn out. The previous sentence is sarcasm, but burnout is real and even more serious with OSS maintainers. Mike McQuaid argues that ‘Open Source Maintainers Owe You Nothing’. Go brush up on OSS etiquette with Mike’s tips for maintainers, contributors and users.

Sam Khawase just made an iOS app that uses data from OpenStreetMaps to help you find a nearby toilet. Google maps and OpenStreetMaps are both great and all, but this is revolutionary. Why has no one thought of this before? Clone the repo, and never search for a bathroom again. In the bay area, you can always check Jennifer Wong’s hackathon project to draw attention to homelessness issues via the SF PoopMap on Human Wasteland.

Victor Arias is doing a ‘What Even Is’ series of posts to help introduce beginners to big data, specifically their tools. This is the first post of the series, which covers ‘What even is Apache Kafka’. Victor purposely made this post beginner friendly, by making it ‘intentionally not a detailed guide’. However, it is still fully everything you need to know to get familiar with Apache Kafka. Learn about tools like Spark, Presto and AWS Athena, with code examples and a brief tl;dr at the bottom if you just want to skip to the end.

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Git inside Linus Torvalds’ head, or at least a neuron of it, to help yourself become more comfortable with Git. Tomer states the obvious with proof that Git is not simple, but a complex system. Tomer breaks advanced Git features down into easy to follow steps. Become familiar with fallback layers of config like global config and merged config with the help of this fun read, ‘Oh git configurations! Let's simplify’. [Editor’s notes: Matt - I don’t always use Git, but when I don’t I regret it. Adam - I always use git.]

UI and UX is hard, so it sounds like a good idea to have a process when you evaluate UI. Instead of just going with your gut, follow Sebastian Hermida’s ‘Process to evaluating an User Interface’. Sebastian’s UI process involves consistency, standards, and recognition.

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Orta Therox has been using React Native for 2 years, so a reflection on the evolution of the project so far was due. Two years of React Native has brought a lot of lessons to Orta and the Artsy Engineering team. A 40 min video follows, which will not disappoint if you are interested in React Native, or have been following it closely.

Dregs:

A Complete Guide to writing functions in Python - Learn how to pass parameters by name and about variadic functions in Python

WeTools: An Elixir Command Line Tool - WePay provides a nice overview of building a complex CLI with elixir

Nix: A Reproducible Setup for Linux and macOS - Nix is consistently in the list of things I've tried and loved but didn't manage to fit into my workflow yet

From Rails to Clojure, then to Java, then back to Rails - fun read, and a note on how Rails hasn't really changed enough to warrant its constant API breakage.

Conundrum - Pathing determination and geometry of overlapping shapes is hard

Exercises in Programming Style - A book which consists of a simple program implemented in 33 different programming styles.

User-defined Order in SQL - nice overview of different ways to provide dynamic reordering and the inherent tradeoffs of each

Introducing GCP’s new interactive CLI - keeping track of all the features in gcloud, kubectl, and friends is exhausting. Now there’s an alpha CLI that offers inline help.

Building a fast Electron app with Rust - Using Electron for rendering and Rust for low level data ops. It’s a very cool combo, but I’m curious if Electron still eats a processor core just because it can.

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https://twitter.com/unbeatablesg/status/975039165174898689?s=19

Today's issue of Inside Dev was hand-crafted for you by the team at www.DailyDrip.com, where you can get daily videos on emerging software development tools, techniques, and patterns.

[2018-03-09] [Weekly Drip 050.1] GitHub sucks for hiring, John Carmack writes NN in C++, Flutter is neat, & Dockermentation

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Atom is working on a new experimental editor called Xray. The goal of Xray is to allow rapid development and testing of radical ideas, which won’t risk the stability of Atom. The first update for the project was announced on March 5, in which Atom announced Xray would start as a 12-week experiment, and the beginning focus would be Text shaping, Anchors and Selections.

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It's possible to write CSS that will work in all browsers, regardless of age. Jen Simmons details this process in seven videos: how to use the latest CSS technologies like CSS Grid, without compromising users older browsers. All the videos can also be found out the mozilla outreach youtube channel, Layout Land.

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Flutter is all the rage this week, and we found a neat article (from August of last year) that goes into some specifics we haven't yet seen summarized. Mohamed Labouardy combines Flutter and AWS Lambda to make a serverless mobile application. Go through Mohamed’s step by step tutorial to get a movies listing app built with Flutter up and running!

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It ends up keeping your GitHub green (active) isn’t as important as you might have thought. 17% of users on GitHub pushed no code publicly last year. If you still aren’t feeling good about yourself, only 1.4% of users pushed more code greater than 100 times. In Ben Frederickson’s neat piece, ‘Why GitHub Won't Help You With Hiring’, you can also mess with an interactive graph to see how your number of followers compares with your friends, coworkers, and ofcourse Linus Torvalds.

John Carmack took a week off to build a neural network with C++ on a OpenBSD system. John details the week, which was a break from work for him, in a facebook post. He found himself watching some Stanford CS213N lectures, debating the value of C++ and eventually having a hacky neural network that he will likely use when an established NN library isn’t needed.

Experienced in automated testing? Check out this micro-course on Ruby testing. The course contains four lessons that will help you get comfy with testing in Ruby. No experience with Ruby is required to start.

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Dmitri Melikyan’s collection of ‘Practical Go Benchmarks’ is a great set of interesting algorithms in Go, and how they benchmark themselves. If you want to improve your Go skills and learn more about algorithms, this is a good place to start. If you just want to brush up on your algorithm knowledge, check out Introduction to Algorithms instead.

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Yes, you already have a linter, so why do you need Prettier? Good question, and Saransh Kataria has the answer. Prettier automates formatting, so you don’t have to argue about things like tabs vs. spaces, and it is easy to set up. This makes working on big projects a lot easier to collaborate on, and in general makes your code look a lot better / readable.

It takes Makefiles, Webpack, Babel, Transpiling, Flowtype, and a couple more things to get a JavaScript application running. With so many things to get up and running in JS, one can get overwhelmed quickly. However, it doesn’t have to be this way. Dive into Jesse Hallett’s piece ‘The Lost Art of the Makefile’ before you start your next JavaScript project. Especially if you want to learn when to stick with Webpack, why JS needs a build step, and a solid intro and practical use case for the Makefile.

Tools for automated testing, like Travis CI, are great. However, when automated testing is a 100% use case, coding without similar tools can be intimidating. Nader Safadi goes a step further and refers to coding without automated testing tools is a ‘Paralyzing Fear’. Nader discusses how his team uses testing tools like Elm-Tests, WDIO and SimpleTests, and how using this tools has led him to an insecurity without their presence.

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No more worrying about what exactly the Hacky word means your boss posted on your code. Hackterms is an urban dictionary for Hacker / Computer buzzwords. Some currently trending words are code smell and rubber duck debugging.

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Last week Google announced the beta for Flutter, which was designed to make native apps beautiful. Top features include high-velocity development, expressive and flexible designs, and high-quality experiences. Well, that is great and all, but for all the Android devs out there, Harshit Dwivedi went ahead asked the question for you in his piece ‘What the F**tter!? Understanding Flutter as an Android (Java) Developer’. In this piece, Harshit doesn’t debate on which is better, but instead will help you get a Flutter project up and going.

Phantomjs is suspending all development immediately. Ariya Hidayat announced that there hasn’t been active contribution, so PhantomJS will be archived. The last stable version will be 2.1.1.

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Want to solve a fun problem with Ecto.Multi? Probably not, but after reading Lena Feldberg’s post about it you will no longer worry, and instead love Ecto.Multi. Take a look at the the NomNomsFarm GitHub Repo to see the toy elixir app that was built with GraphQL. If that was not fun enough for you try ‘Solving a Mysterious Heap Corruption Crash’ with Agnes

Machine Learning is hot, but that doesn’t mean it’s simple to learn. However, it might not be as hard to get started as you thought, Emmanuel Ameisen recommends always starting with a stupid model. Emmanuel argues that a baseline model helps you understand data and understand the task. He then talks about how to choose a baseline, and when to move on from it.

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Mozilla has started an experiment in hopes of reducing bias during code reviews. The two part experiment aims to anonymize PRs and gather information on how blind reviews work. The project’s goal is to fight unintentional bias based off things like gender and race.

The long and winding road to become a senior developer is quite the trip. Alfonso Paredes Cervantes has some tips for anyone currently on the road to becoming a senior developer. Top tips include: (1) Know & keep priorities (2) Avoid assumptions (3) Analyze before coding. Not enough tips for you? Follow it up with Julia Evans’ tips on computer networking. tl;dr Learning takes a long time. - Julia Evans.

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RedMonk’s programming language rankings are in. They rank based upon factors including number of pull requests, exclude forks, and historical rankings JavaScript landed on top, followed by Java and Python. However, RedMonk has some very interesting things to say about Go, Kotlin, Powershell and Rust, so make sure to check out the whole read.

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Hillel Wayne discussed the importance of code documentation on Twitter, too.

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https://twitter.com/atebitbyte/status/971478316484997120

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[2018-02-09] [Weekly Drip 046.1] Dinosaurs teach CSS, Developer Compensation, Cargo Cult Development, and ReasonML finds traction

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The dinosaurs are back. This time not to take over, but to explain modern CSS. Learn about the advantages of flexbox, grid and CSS preprocessors and postprocessors in this gem of an explanation. Dinosaurs aside, Peter Jang gives a great intro to Modern CSS.

Does your company struggle to reach Senior Developers and CTOs? Does your product need exposure to the developer community? DailyDrip can help! Contact support@dailydrip.com to get started.

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Is developer compensation becoming bimodal? tl;dr Dan Luu says probably not but he needs more data. I disagree: it seems to be and it makes sense that it would be. The Orange Site comments discuss it compared to Electrical Engineering not really being bimodal in the same way. From my point of view, it comes down to Electrical Engineering being a commodity in a way that software development is not, due to the fast-paced nature of the field. The best programmers tend to dig into programming minutiae in detail in a way that far fewer traditional engineers do within their field. The programmers that don’t do this tend to fall into the first mode.

James Flight writes on critical thinking in software development, the word ‘should’, and why you shouldn’t listen to Martin Fowler. It’s an intentional clickbait title to draw attention to the pitfalls of shiny-object-driven-development. Flight points out that the facts relevant to the argument are the technical and domain details of the project in question. I’ve fallen into this trap before, so nice to be cognizant of it.

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ReasonML is a syntax and toolchain for OCaml, which can compile down to JavaScript, native code, or bytecode. Khoa Nguyen’s article discusses the toolchain in detail and how it fits together. Once you’re familiar with ReasonML, you might want to deploy a ReasonML React app with Docker.

Development Dregs

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https://twitter.com/kvlly/status/959827106384490496

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[2018-02-02] [Weekly Drip 045.1] Deploy with Fargate, Rust matches its Roadmap, and Webpack 4 beta drops

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If you’ve been curious about Deploying to AWS take a look at Bradley Price’s guide to Amazon’s Elastic Container Service and Fargate. Price details creating a task definition, creating a cluster and a service, and lastly viewing the site. Also, check out the next post in the series, which is focused on Log aggregation.

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Rust had a big year last year following its 2017 roadmap. So, we have big expectations for another Rust roadmap this year. Some of Rust’s goals for this year include building resources for the intermediate Rust user, and growing Rust teams and leaders from within. Take a look at the Rust 2018 Roadmap.

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Webpack 4 beta was released. In the release announcement, they mention performance improvements, zero-configuration (#0CJS) support, better defaults, smarter dead code elimination thanks to sideEffects: false, tree-shaking for JSON, no-transpiler ES6, .mjs and WebAssembly support. In other words: lots of new goodies, and it’s nearly at a stable release.

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1Password is a great tool, and by far my favorite of the Password management tools. They are really developer friendly. In Terraforming 1Password, AgileBits covers its migration from CloudFormation to Terraform, in detail. The author covers their architecture, the differences in configuration between the two platforms, and the actual migration. Don’t skip the comments, the author stays around and does a lot of Q&A in them.

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If you’re jonesing for an Elixir conference, there are a couple coming up imminently: Lonestar ElixirConf 2018 is in Austin, TX February 22-24, and ElixirDaze 2018 is in Denver, CO March 1-2. Either one is bound to be amazing, so feel free to choose based on weather and scenery preferences :) Better yet, go to both!

Development Dregs

Twitter was good this week, ok?

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@wfaler mocks up: If HackerNews was BuilderNews

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[2018-01-19] [Weekly Drip 043.1] Beyond Bitcoin, Vue.js Rising, AI-Curated Garbage

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The New York Times isn’t a site we often link to, but in Beyond the Bitcoin Bubble author Steven Johnson dives deep into bitcoin, blockchain, and why that’s important for the future of the internet. He explores why the token infrastructure is important, and blockchain should not stand alone as a technical masterpiece. The closing talks about why blockchain tech is important to the future of the open web, and a possible counter to the walled gardens and megacorps of today’s web.

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We previously covered the pix2code paper and AirBnB’s sketch2code. In further research regarding turning web design mockups into code with Deep Learning, Emil Wallner shares code and a write-up detailing teaching a neural network how to code a basic HTML and CSS site based on a picture of a design mockup. He also teaches it to use Bootstrap to reduce complexity and code size. Check out the code on GitHub and Jupyter notebooks on FloydHub.

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WebAssembly is about to get faster when Firefox 58 drops next week. The new update will include Firefox’s streaming compiler, which allows the browser to compile code while the code is still being downloaded.

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Have you ever thought to yourself the internet currently sucks, but couldn’t quite put your finger on why? Tyler Glaiel has a very interesting twitter thread arguing why the internet is currently ran by ‘AI curated garbage’, which will eventually lead users to different platforms.

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2017 JavaScript Rising Stars surveys what is most popular in the JavaScript Landscape by comparing the numbers of stars added on GitHub over the last 12 months. The most popular js project overall was Vue.js with more than 40k stars. A distant second stood React with 27.8k stars, and Create React App in third with 22.5k stars. Take a look at all of the results from the 2017 JavaScript Rising Stars.

Development Dregs

Deep Dive - Awesome Blockchain stuff

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https://twitter.com/mcclure111/status/954137509843398656

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[2018-01-12] [Weekly Drip 042.1] Elixir Survey, Why security is difficult, Browser Wars Story time, Quantum computing in 2018

If you clicked here expecting to see the Weekly Drip for Jan. 20, click here. Sorry about that :)

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Each year since 2014 I have surveyed the Elixir community about its use of the language and the makeup of the community. You can see the results for 2016 here. If you use Elixir, are thinking about using Elixir, hate Elixir, or have never heard of Elixir but somehow landed on this page, I'd love it if you would click here to fill out the survey. Thanks so much!

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The start of 2018 has brought some scary reminders that security is important. David Gilbertson, with security heavy on his heart, decided to tell the world how he has been harvesting credit card numbers, usernames and passwords from websites. David argues that even if you notice the network requests or read all the minified source of all code in node_modules you are still at risk! At the end of the post Gilbertson states the post is fictional, but plausible and hopes to educate developers on web security.

Robert O’Callahan just published four posts from 2007 in light of the emergence of Webkit at a time when the fight for browser dominance involved only Firefox, IE, and Opera. It’s compelling to read through what an opinionated developer went through during the second wave of the great browser wars.

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Nora Sandler deeps dives on writing your own C compiler in an ongoing series. This is a great intro not only to C, but how to write a compiler in general. Don’t be scared off by the complexity of the subject, as Nora does a wonderful job of making a complex problem approachable. Check out parts One, Two, Three, Four, and Five.

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It’s a brave new world for Quantum computing, and 2018 looks to be a year of good growth with systems of 50+ general-purpose qubits being obtained. China is making large investments in QC, but little to no news about their progress is being shared. Experts agree that a commercially deployable quantum computer with thousands of logical qubits is over a decade away. Maybe we’ll get Quantum computing and fusion in the same year.

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If you want to become a web developer check out the Web Developer Roadmap for 2018. Whether you want to specialize in Front-end, Back-end, or DevOps this roadmap will help you visualize where you need to get started.

Development Dregs

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[2018-01-05] [Weekly Drip 041.1] ZOMG Processors, Cold Showers for the Hot New Thing, and Browser Security

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It was a bad week for processors. Three teams independently discovered the Meltdown attack, and two teams discovered the Spectre attack. Google’s Project Zero has a great writeup on these major vulnerabilities with Intel, AMD, and ARM processors. Intel has responded to the security findings, which The Register has found will lead to as much as a 30% slowdown for older computers. Read more about the design flaw ‘at the heart of Intel CPUs’ or read Linus Torvalds’s thoughts on the situation. By the way, some people saw it coming. For an overview of the past couple days take a look at Peter Brights article on Ars Technica. For a chuckle, read some kernel code submitted by AMD in the aftermath.

Sometimes people get way too excited about things in software development. Check out Hillel Wayne’s new Awesome Cold Showers to point your friends to that are a little too excited about things like Scalability, Web Framework Benchmarks, and Agile Methods. I’m fascinated that there's no cold shower on distributed computation or blockchain. Let’s make that happen.

TIL that if you are using a browser-based password manager instead of something like lastpass or 1password, you should migrate off of it. tl;dr ad networks are identifying users based upon invisible form elements that are auto-filled by browser’s internal password managers (primarily usernames). There is no technical reason they couldn’t do the same thing to extract passwords.

Development Dregs

Blog Posts this week from DailyDrip

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https://twitter.com/BryanLunduke/status/948430797266042880

https://twitter.com/knewter/status/948775835712049152

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[2017-12-29] [Weekly Drip 040.1] JavaScript’s domination continues, 34C3 shares visions of the future, and how Ethereum executes a transaction

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Welcome to the Octoverse, full of pretty visuals and interesting stats that (sadly?) show JavaScript is still the most popular language. Since September 2016 there have been 1 billion public commits, 47 million PR’s (public and private) & the 100,000,000th PR was made. The top five languages were: (1) JavaScript (2) Python (3) Java (4) Ruby (5) PHP. Scroll through ‘The State of the Octoverse 2017’ for more fun visuals and statistics. Continuing proof that Ruby is dead [sic] - Python, Ruby, and Java are very close to each other in PRs, and Ruby vastly outnumber PHP in popularity of PRs.

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This is the 34C3 playlist for the ongoing conference. There are also livestreams!

The Chaos Communication Congress is a fantastic event every year, and I binge watch it like crazy this time of year. A few select talks: Regulating Autonomous Weapons; Designing PCBs with Code; BBSes and early internet access in the nineties. You could also go watch last year’s talks, as these things are evergreen. Trivial prediction: somewhere in this year’s talks, someone pwns some ATMs.

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Ever wondered what executing a transaction in Ethereum actually does? In Life Cycle of an Ethereum Transaction, Mahesh Murthy covers an end-to-end transaction, explains how Metamask gets involved when you perform transactions in the browser for dApps, and discusses how to deal with paranoia. I learned things :)

Development Dregs

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https://twitter.com/EffinBirds/status/946455733259980800

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[2017-12-22] [Weekly Drip 039.1] Graphs (real and fake), Profilers, Firefox eats crow

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Have you ever wanted to visualize a GitHub profile? Now you can, with GitHub Profile Summary. After you star the GitHub repo, you can enter your profile name to visualize your GitHub profile. Thanks for the awesome tool David!

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You learned nothing from the above graph. Read a bogus study on code review to find out why. In it, Wesley Aptekar-Cassels dives into an oft-cited research set and points out numerous ways in which it is deficient. To coin a term, it is fake news. Wesley ends with I encourage you to think critically about the data being presented, find original sources to determine the methodology being used to collect data, and at the very least double check that the graph that you're being shown actually supports the claim that's being made.

Firefox is once again in the top stories, but not for a normal reason. There were some concerns when someone found a suspicious looking dev addon called Looking Glass 1.0.3. Drew DeVault wrote up a good explanation of Firefox’s slippery slope, which goes into more detail. The good news is that Firefox apologized. Firefox stated on the 18th “We didn’t think hard enough about how our actions would affect the community, and we’re sorry for letting you down.”

Ever wondered how Ruby & Python profilers work? The always-readworthy Julia Evans has a comprehensive post discussing tracing and sampling profilers in Ruby and Python. She cautions against naively accepting numbers from tracing profilers: For example, if you have 2 implementations of something – one with a lot of function calls and one without, which take the same amount of time, the one with a lot of function calls will appear to be slower when profiled. The post finishes with a list of detailed posts about pyflame, which is how she wants her Ruby profilers to work as well.

Rust had a great year in 2017. They had some big goals outlined in there 2017 roadmap, which they published in February. Some major milestones they met included lowering the bar for entry to rust. This included the start of creating several books for Rust (one available to preorder now). Also, improving the RustBridge workshop curriculum, which is available for free. Read more about what Rust achieved this year on their blog.

Development Dregs

Blog Posts this week from DailyDrip

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https://twitter.com/chrisalbon/status/943342608742604801

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[2017-12-15] [Weekly Drip 038.1] Blockchain Blockers, The State of JavaScript, Sustainable FE practices

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Preethy Kasireddy discusses fundamental challenges to bringing public blockchains mainstream, and provides a summary of potential upcoming solutions to each of them. She thinks less effort should be spent on ICOs, and more on overcoming these hurdles, including scalability concerns, insufficient privacy, inadequate tooling, and more. My personal concerns are formal verification (let’s avoid DAO2) and on-chain governance, but it’s nice to be reminded of where my blind spots are. This is an impressive write up by an expert in blockchain, and not to be missed!

Looking to get hired as a Software Engineer? Look no further. Coding Interview University is a list of study topics to help you become a Software Engineer. John Washam made the list, and it is the material he used to study before he got a job at Amazon as a Software Engineer. I’ve seen a couple of these before, and I’ve bookmarked this one to go through. Best one yet, bar none.

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GitHub predicts next year data will rule all. Jason Warner, SVP of Technology at GitHub, says 2017 was all about ML and AI. Warner predicts in 2018 the workflow war heating up, security moving into the spotlight permanently, and open source continuing to climb the stack. What are your 2018 predictions? Tweet @dailydripcom to tell us! Matt predicts Angular will have 5 more versions.

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Do you hate writing Front-end code? Maybe you are just missing some best practices. Evil Martians explores how to write a Modern Front-end in Rails. Their first and second articles start a series that is applicable not just to the Rails world, but most MVC frameworks. They are well researched and full of great advice on how to take your junk drawer of CSS and turn it into a maintainable structure that you’ll be happy to work in.

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The results are in for The State of JavaScript 2017 Survey. 20,000+ developers in the JS world responded for the richest and messiest year JavaScript has seen yet. Most JS developers are using React over other frameworks, and they are interested in learning Vue. Over ⅓ of JS developers are not satisfied with any back-end js technologies, see what they are using instead. The results feature an awesome ‘connections tool’, which allows you select different tools respondents most often use with other tools in the JS ecosystem.

Development Dregs

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[2017-12-08] [Weekly Drip 037.1] Generative Adversarial Networks, Django 2.0, CSS Grids, and Spider Monkey optimizations

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Pranoy Radhakrishnan says that if Deep Learning is Software 2.0, then Generative Adversarial Networks are Photoshop 2.0. Generative Adversarial Networks (GAN) can be used to map a semantic map of an image to a photorealistic synthesized image. Think a much nicer version of the classic Children’s Drawings Painted Realistically. If the introductory article piques your interest, you should read the paper, High-Resolution Image Synthesis and Semantic Manipulation with Conditional GANs. To see how it’s implemented, check out the code.

Django 2.0 is here. New features include a simplified URL routing syntax, mobile-friendly contrib.admin, and window expressions. Read all the new features and changes on the Django 2.0 release notes. Did you click that link? If you did make sure and checkout the next story below. :)

Are you really good at Python/Django/ML? How about Postgres? DailyDrip is looking for a couple of experts to help write amazing content on those topics. If you think you are a fit, email support@dailydrip.com for more info!

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It’s finally time to start implementing CSS Grids in your applications. Virtually everyone supports it except for older IEs. Per Harald Borgen on FreeCodeCamp explores how to quickly prototype websites with CSS Grid. This is a wonderful guide that explores the basics of CSS Grids without ceremony. Includes code, pictures, and great examples. I can’t wait to abandon CSS frameworks for layout!

Jandem writes in detail about SpiderMonkey optimizations in FF Quantum. Check out optimizations made for shift/unshift. Regular expressions, and inline caches. Also, if you aren’t familiar you can read more about Mozilla’s JavaScript engine, SpiderMonkey.

Development Dregs

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[2017-11-17] [Weekly Drip 035.1] Be a better technical leader, make Firefox fast with Rust, resize tons of images with Go, don’t use NoSQL

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Firefox has gone Quantum. Guess what? It’s really fast. Like, twice as fast as 6 months ago. And, as of Nov. 13 WebAssembly support shipped on all major browsers. The Quantum Era is just beginning, and Firefox already has plans on where it’s going to improve even more. Anecdotally after playing with FF57 for a couple hours, it was so fast I switched back to it, off of Chrome. I was really pleasantly surprised how great the developer tools have gotten in it, as well!

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VR on the web is here. DailyDrip produced a free short video introducing ReactVR. ReactVR is a crazy-productive environment for building VR experiences rapidly for the web. If you’re interested in digging in further, there are an additional four videos diving into building slightly more complex VR webapps. NOTE: It’s better than VRML.

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Discord uses Go and C++ to resize over 150 million images every day. They created a tool, which they open-sourced called Lilliput. Read more about how Discord handles a ridiculous amount of image resizing on the their blog.

Stavros Korokithakis writes about mistakes startups make when choosing their datastore. At a high level, it’s a discussion of something I tell people all of the time: schemaless isn’t a thing - the word you’re looking for is “unplanned.” Since most data is relational, eschewing RDBMSes to “move fast” largely means shifting problems with known, optimized solutions onto your (overworked) application developers. Favorite quote: “For every business that just couldn’t get the speed or scalability they needed out of Postgres, a hundred others had performance problems because they had to do their joins in the application.”

A big week for engineering management posts brings some great advice on how to be a solid technical leader. The Senior Engineer’s Guide to Helping Others Make Decisions talks about how senior engineers can better guide their juniors to make good technical decisions. In Feedback That Gives Focus talks about how to both give and receive technical feedback, while building a shared vision around practices that work. The Role of being Technical in Technical Leadership explores how to stay relevant as a leader when you aren’t coding. Finally there are great reasons why you shouldn’t deal with Brilliant Jerks in Engineering which also explores their effects on a team.

Happy Birthday Go and Fortran! Fortran turned 60, it was introduced in 1957, and Go was released as an open source project 8 years ago. Read more about what is keeping Fortran going, or the history and growing popularity of Go.

Development Dregs

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https://mobile.twitter.com/wesbos/status/926541587060051968

Blog Posts this week from DailyDrip

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[2017-11-10] [Weekly Drip 034.1] Unified Logs, ML-driven design, Frids, !STDs, and real-time ASCII art

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We previously mentioned the upcoming Redis Streams, and now Brandur Leach wrote up an in-depth article describing how they can be used to build a unified log with consumers that are resilient to failure. tl;dr we’ve built databases and file-systems this way for a while now, and now—well, soon—there’s a lightweight tool (i.e. not Kafka) to introduce the same resilience in your apps. Do yourself a favor and read the article.

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‘Grids arrived to kill flexbox’ and ‘Flexbox is Grid’s fall back’ are two rumors that Eva Ferreira has debunked. Ferreira argues that the two actually complement each other pretty well. If you aren’t super familiar with working with Frids-layout or the box alignment spec, this is a great place to start embracing the new responsive.

Well, it turns out 11% of americans think HTML is a Sexually Transmitted Disease. If you have ever struggled with HTML, as long as you know it is a markup language and not an STD, you are at least ahead of 11% of America. Read the whole study (not completely dev related) to get a couple of laughs.

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Remember a couple weeks ago, when we talked about how to do code reviews like a human? Just in case you still aren’t sure how to do a code review like a human, Michael Lynch released part two. Some tips include limiting feedback on repeated patterns and offering sincere praise. Check out the other five tips, with in-depth explanations, on Michael’s blog.

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Symisc Systems made a Real-Time ASCII art rendering app. Using machine learning to match pixels to the best fitting ASCII characters produces surprisingly good results, by first training a dataset using the Structural Similarity (SSIM) Index. You can use an image you have saved or live-stream your webcam as ASCII art. Check out the code, try it out now, or read the corresponding paper.

Development Dregs

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Intel ME is dead, long live Intel MEHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH

https://twitter.com/h0t_max/status/928269320064450560

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[2017-11-03] [Weekly Drip 033.1] Best week ever! Adobe on UX, ML survey responses, Rust is growing fast, Most hated languages

New Drips this week on DailyDrip.com

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Over at Adobe, Nick Babich wrote up A Comprehensive Overview of UX Design Deliverables. He covers what kind of things a UX designer does daily, and there are some great things you can integrate into your development process from this. It’s a master work on initial project discovery. On the Lyft blog Della Anjeh covers How to Write Awesome Tech Specs which is a natural extension of the discovery process. While these articles aren’t strictly code, internalizing some of the concepts and putting those tools in your kit can greatly increase your dev productivity and yes, salary!

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Kaggle ended up with more than 16,000 responses to their Data Science and Machine Learning survey. Some highlights: more often Statisticians are using R instead of Python even though Python is more commonly used overall; average salary of respondents was 55k; 41.8% of respondents have a masters degree. Take a look at all of the insights and data the survey collected.

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Take a look at Jonathan Turner’s fun facts about Rust’s growing popularity! Turner highlights the growing Rust scene and highlights Rust Podcasts, Rust conferences, and the Rust Reddit. Read all of the fun facts to learn more about the current Rust scene. Oh yeah, and 100+ organizations are using Rust in production. NBD.

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Stackoverflow details the most disliked programming languages based on what developers preference of languages not to work with. Ends up Perl is the most disliked programming language, followed by delphi and vba. Stackoverflow also charted the most disliked tags, which ‘internet-explorer’ was the most disliked tag, followed by ‘visual-basic’ and ‘cobol’.

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Ofir Press wrote a great post walking through Neural Language Modeling From Scratch. Language models are a fundamental part of many systems that attempt to solve natural language processing tasks such as machine translation and speech recognition. If you’re interested in learning about the theory behind language models, you won’t be disappointed.

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Slack writes of their growing pains migrating Slack’s desktop app to BrowserView. They dig into how they interact between various processes - interestingly, they have a Master Store that’s their primary source of truth and individual processes are eventually consistent. Their big takeaways: Redux + redux-electron: Means we don’t have to think about where reducers live or where actions are dispatched. Rx + redux-observable: Turns our store into an interprocess event bus with functional superpowers. TypeScript: Helps us refactor code quickly and correctly.

Development Dregs

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https://twitter.com/NetflixUIE/status/923374215041912833

Blog Posts this week from DailyDrip

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If The World Was Created By A Programmer [Comic]

[2017-10-27] [Weekly Drip 032.1] Better Code Reviews, Android Studio supports Kotlin, How Unreal Renders a Frame

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Jeff Wainwright details Code Review Etiquette on CSS-Tricks. Some of his tips include keeping passionate conversations quite and trying to review the code instead of the author. Jeff notes that right and wrong sometimes can change so it is important to conceptualize each situation.

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Android Studio released version 3.0. Newest features include instant run, Intelligent code editor and a feature-rich emulator. Also, starting with this release and moving forward, Android studio will support Kotlin.

The folks behind the Ego web framework released Riot, an Open Source full text search engine written in Go. The engine features are efficient indexing and search, support for logical search, and a very simple way to get started. Look at some of the different examples to get started. Having something other than Lucene sounds fantastic.

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Have you ever wondered how unreal engine renders a frame? Well, either way, you are in luck, because Kostas Anagnostou did a 3 part series on exactly how unreal engine renders frames. Kostas explains and examines Particle Simulation, Z-Prepass, Testing to occlusion and more. Take a look at part 1, part 2 & part 3.


Teach Elixir or Elm

DailyDrip is seeking developers to write interesting Elixir and Elm content. Email support@dailydrip.com if you’re interested.

Elixir @ Orchard Systems

Interested in writing production-grade Elixir, upending physical commerce, and taking down antiquated Fortune 100 incumbents? Follow the link for more info -> https://orderorchard.com/elixirjob.html


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Blog posts this week on DailyDrip.com

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[2017-10-20] [Weekly Drip 031.1] Neural nets colorize B&W photos, MDN docs go cross browser, & iFrames get easier

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The most impressive story this week comes from Emil Wallner, who shows how to use Neural Networks to colorize black and white photographs. Also check out the original post where a user used a similar bot to troll a colorization subreddit -- very cool work. I wonder what would happen if you only trained the NN with HDR images? Related, and also cool is this Perceptually uniform color spaces, just to scratch your programmatic color theory itch.

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Mozilla, Microsoft, Google, Samsung, and the W3C are collaborating to make the MDN web docs fully cross browser. MDN easily has the best html/css/js documentation on the net, and with this new partnership they are hoping to make it accurate for all the big browsers. A Product Advisory Board has been formed to guide the partnership.

Have you ever thought the ‘top talent’ on your team could be holding a project back? You are not alone. Jonathan Solórzano-Hamilton tells a story about how firing the top talent on his team was the best decision they ever made. Make sure to read the whole article, and the 🔥🔥 mixed opinions🔥🔥 in the comments. Also, read Tony Robinson’s response, and the conversation about his response on the orange website.

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Having trouble understanding Modern Javascript? You are not alone. Luckily, Peter Jang has explanation of Modern Javascript that even a Dinosaur can understand. Read the article and learn about using a package manager, transpiling code for new language features, and using a task runner.

PayPal introduced a new open source suite to make cross-domain iframes and requests easier. The tools in the suite include grumbler, post-robot, xcomponent & more. Take a look at the whole suite. Great for all your ifame needs, can’t wait to try this one!

Development Dregs

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https://twitter.com/dailydripcom/status/921127859103547392

Blog Posts this week from DailyDrip

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[2017-10-13] [Weekly Drip 030.1] Is Agile Working? Spotify uses ML to suggest tracks, Techniques for better code reviews

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The great debate over proper Software Development Management techniques rages on, with Agile again in the cross hairs. Cutler argues that Agile isn’t a silver bullet, and one still has to do the hard work of continuous improvement on your process. Commenters point out that most people who claim to do ‘Agile’ are doing nothing like it.

Spotify detailed how it makes personal music recommendations with machine learning. The Discovery Weekly playlist has three different models, Collaborative Filtering, NLP & Audio. Learn more about how each model works, and how your personal playlist is generated.

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Mozilla continues its recent history of spitting fire, with a great writeup on how moving from the CPU to GPU for motion removes choppiness and makes for a better web experience. Check out how WebRender gets rid of jank.

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GitHub introduced ‘Discover’ and completely redesigned ‘Explore’. The Discover feed will be based on other projects you have starred, or creators you have followed. Take a look at the new Discover Feed, try out the new Explore page, and read about the updates in full-detail on GitHub’s blog.

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Michael Lynch walks through how to do a Code Review like a human. From what a code review is, why it's hard, and a step-by-step simple guide to get started this article covers it all. Some tips Michael advise include, settling style arguments with a style guide, starting high level and working down, and tying notes to principles instead of opinions.

Development Dregs

Blog Posts this week from DailyDrip

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[2017-10-06] [Weekly Drip 029.1] Contractors make more 💰, Encrypted Git, & Mozilla 💖’s OSS

News

In San Francisco, contractors are potentially making more than full-time employees. On average, contract workers are making $214,000 compared to full-time workers salary $134,000. Hired.com’s data also showed contract work is up 4% since 2015. Read a full writeup on the data by the San Francisco Business Times.

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Keybase launched encrypted git. The feature is end-to-end encrypted, and is a free alternative to Github private repositories. You can also clone an existing repository from GitHub, Gitlab, or Bitbucket as well.

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Mozilla awarded $539,000 to OSS projects. Top awards went to Ushahidi ($194,000), Webpack ($125,000) and RiseUp ($100,000). Read more about MOSS (Mozilla Open Source Support), and recent open source projects Mozilla is supporting.

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Are you ready to get your Hacktoberfest on? We want to help you. DailyDrip will be holding a Remote Hackathon to help people contribute to open source projects to get their Hacktoberfest PRs in. DailyDrip’s Remote Hacktoberfest Hackathon will be from Oct. 13th - 15th, but Hacktoberfest is all month long. Register for the Hackathon weekend, and we’ll code something awesome together.

Development Dregs

Blog Posts this week from DailyDrip

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[2017-09-29] [Weekly Drip 029.1] Facebook reliscenses GraphQL/React, Lyft uses Typescript, and Hacking your coding interviews

News

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Facebook finally came around and relicensed React under the MIT license. They also relicensed the GraphQL specification, and they released React version 16. They also published a big writeup talking through their rewrite for version 16. Big stuff.

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October is just around the corner, which means Hacktoberfest is here! Digital Ocean has partnered with GitHub to celebrate OSS with Hacktoberfest all month long. The premise is simple: submit four open source contributions on GitHub, and get a free limited-edition T-Shirt. Read more about Hacktoberfest 2017. DailyDrip and Inside Dev are organizing a hackathon weekend to help people get their Hacktoberfest on, sign up and we’ll code something awesome together.

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Yahoo (Oath now, I guess) released Vespa - their open-source Big Data Processing Engine. Vespa will make it easy for anyone to build applications that can **compute responses to user requests, over large datasets, at real time and at internet scale.** Think of it a bit like a real-time Hadoop, from the people who gave us Hadoop in the first place. Yahoo uses it to power their search, recommendation, personalization, and ad products across a ton of properties.

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Lyft wrote up an excellent explanation for they they use TypeScript. Large JavaScript programs need types or they become unmaintainable. A good typesystem can completely remove classes of bugs like undefined is not a function from your codebase, and help you find bugs at compile-time rather than runtime. Refactoring also becomes easy, which is basically never the case with vanilla JS. They also point out that TypeScript plays with React at least as nicely as Flow does. TypeScript and Elm are great directions for the web to move, love seeing some of the bigger engineering groups pick them up and help proselytize!

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Yangshun Tay published a complete Technical and non-technical guide for rocking your coding interview on GitHub. It includes interview formats for some of the larger dev groups, techniques to prepare for an interview, lots of sample questions and answers and a deep dive into behavioral and tricks often used in tech interviews. A really great resource for hacking an interview.

Development Dregs

Blog Posts this week from DailyDrip

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[2017-09-22] [Weekly Drip 027.1] RIP open web, Calculate Your Dev Salary, VIM users make more $$$

News

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The W3C published their recommendation for Encrypted Media Extensions. Implementing EME requires browser implementers to include a proprietary component into their browsers. This is what is known in the lingo as breaking the freaking open web. As a result of this recommendation being published, the EFF has now resigned from the W3C. This comes after the EFF filed the first ever formal appeal against this recommendation.

The W3C was supposed to be about consensus and compromise. Technically, 58% is a majority, but historically all measures have been passed with more full consensus. In reality, this is what it looks like when media conglomerates force a big lock onto a formally open system so they can sell you more animated videos.

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Have you ever wondered how much money you should be making at your job? Great news! Stack Overflow has a tool to tell you precisely how much you should be making based on your years of experience, education level, and location. Tech Crunch wrote all about it, and you can go test out the tool yourself to make sure your salary is up to par.

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You might should switch VIM or Pycharm if you are about to take a technical interview. According to Triplebytes data, developers using these one of these two editors have a much higher pass rate of technical quizzes than developers using other editors. Developers that used eclipse had the least success.

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CoffeeScript 2 was announced this week to mixed fanfare. Everyone is impressed by an almost-dead project getting picked up and a major version released, a big win for Open Source. The ongoing debate between straight ES6 and pre-processors continues on the orange site, with many developers impressed by the new offerings, but not enough to move from ES6. This could be a big boon for the Ember community, where CoffeeScript has a much higher adoption rate. CoffeeScript helped move the needle on JavaScript getting better. I’m happy it’s moving forward - maybe it can continue the trend. I’m still not thrilled with the state of it.

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Swift released version 4.0. The release has some major updates including improved stability and new features like archival and serialization while providing compatibility with Swift 3. See all the new updates in Swift 4.0 on the Swift blog.

Development Dregs

Blog Posts this week from DailyDrip

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Baby Drone

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[2017-09-15] [Weekly Drip 026.1] Astrophotography, Graphing in Python, and a Deep Dive on Linters

News

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Benedikt Bitterli combined photography with astronomy and tracked stars with C++11. He was able to track stars, and produce very nice images. He doesn’t claim to be an expert photographer, but looks like he did an excellent job.

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Benoit Bernard’s writeup of creating a distributed web crawler in Python is fantastic. With 4 supervisors managing 8 threads each, he managed to crawl over 40 pages/second on a single 512MB DigitalOcean instance. Once he implemented politeness, its distributed nature required architectural changes. Great read but now I want to build a web crawler in Elixir.

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Michael Burge injected a Chess Engine into Amazon Redshift. He wrote the chess engine in C, and he has a tutorial on how he did it if you're up for a game of chess. If you don’t want to set it up, you can click through the first game he successfully completed.

Text editors had a big week. Atom introduced Atom IDE, which GitHub has been collaborating on with Facebook. Atom also announced version 1.20. New features include Git integration improvements, find and replace, and PostCSS support. But wait! There is more big news for text editors. Sublime Text 3.0 is here. New sublime features include syntax highlighting improvement, new color schemes, and touch input support on windows and touch bar support on macOS. Also, Emacs 25.3 released

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Have you ever wondered how FiveThirtyEight produced nice looking graphs? Wonder no more! Alexandru Olteanu takes you through making a FiveThirtyEight graph in Python. Start from nothing, and produce an aesthetically pleasing graph. Their graphs are cool, but too bad most of their projections after 2012 are wrong.

Development Dregs

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Dive Deeper - Improve your code quality with Linters

You should run a linter in your CI setup and in your editor. They will help your team write consistent and better code. Some of them (like Rubocop) can even fix style errors for you. Here are a few we think are fantastic :)

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[2017-09-08] [Weekly Drip 025.1] ElixirConf 2017, Python beats Javascript, Yarn 1.0, & How Blockchain Works

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ElixirConf 2017 was this week. Go take a look at some of the talks like Thinking in Ecto and Writing an Editor in Elixir. You can take a look at the schedule or watch all of the talks. [ed. I’m giving a talk on the Firestorm Forum in a few hours.]

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PHP, C#, and Java see little to no growth over the past 6 years. Python has skyrocketed in popularity and use. For the first time Python is more popular than Javascript according to Stackoverflow trends tool, and future traffic only predicts even more popularity for the language.

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Facebook announced Yarn 1.0. The package manager is now averaging right below 3 billion package downloads per month. New features in Yarn 1.0 include Yarn Workspaces, Auto-merging of lockfiles and selective version resolutions.

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Sean Han built an app to illustrate how a blockchain works. You can install the app via command line or try it out in the browser. Learn about blockchain basics in a fun way, and read about what keeps a blockchain immutable.

Alex Devero has six simple tips for you on how to write clean code. Top tips include making code readable, using meaningful names for variables, and letting every function or method only perform one task. Alex argues that your code will be easier for team onboarding and easier to follow if you follow his six tips. Read all of his tips and get started writing some clean code.

alt text Headless Chrome is way faster than PhantomJS, shows @Hartator. In his tests, he shows Headless Chrome is more than twice as fast as PhantomJS while consuming a third less memory. Switch now, double your integration speeds?

Development Dregs

Dive Deeper - Deep Learning, Machine Learning & AI

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[2017-09-01] [Weekly Drip 024.1] ARCore, Clippy’s Revenge, and Finding Satoshi

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Google released ARCore, their library for easily producing Augmented Reality experiences. They go into lots of detail in their official announcement blog post. Right now it runs on the Samsung S8 and the Pixel, but they’re targeting 100 million devices by the end of their preview period. Apparently it’s largely a renaming of the existing Tango SDK - but that just means it’s had years of real-world use. Out of the box, it works with Java/OpenGL, Unity and Unreal.

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In which Alexander Muse talks about unconfirmed reports of How the NSA identified Satoshi Nakamoto via stylometry. By tracking statistics of word usage and sentence structure, Alexander claims the NSA identified the individual(s) behind Satoshi. Makes one wonder when a project that attempts to mask your identity by shifting words and phrases to match common usage and other authors will appear.

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Clippy is back as a plugin for VisualStudio! Go download ClippyVS, and tell your old friend Clippy hello. The extension is still in development, but the author boasts that Clippy is back in most of its original glory. Can’t wait for the upgrades: “It looks like you’re trying to compile with syntax errors!”

Let’s rethink drag and drop with Alex Reardon. Alex analyzes what makes a drag and drop interface more beautiful, natural, and accessible. He proposes that physicality is the core design principle that makes the difference -- and made it the main idea behind react-beautiful-dnd.

Deep learning enthusiast Aymeric Damien made a tutorial for beginners on TensorFlow. From ‘hello world’ to training a neural network on multiple GPUs, this tutorial has everything you need to get started with TensorFlow. Go try it out now.

Development Dregs

Dive Deeper - ARCore

This post was written by the DailyDrip team and syndicated via Inside.com's network of email newsletters.

[2017-08-25] [Weekly Drip 023.1] CSS gets fast, Learn Crystal, Android noms Oreos, Cryptocurrency via Python

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The Crystal core team has released a series of free videos introducing the Crystal Programming Language. In five episodes, go from installing the language to building a database-backed webserver in under thirty minutes. Crystal’s syntax is heavily inspired by Ruby, though it’s a compiled language that’s wonderfully fast. It also comes with modern tooling, including the above-pictured playground.

alt text Patrick Triest analyzed cryptocurrency markets with Python. Triest provides a tutorial on how to compare different cryptocurrency market prices over the last two years. From setting up your data lab to performing correlation analysis, Triest walks you through how to get the data yourself.

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Michal Konarski has learned some valuable things about programming while using Go. He notes 5 things specifically Go has helped him learn. The top of the list includes ‘ It is possible to have both dynamic-like syntax and static safety’ and that ‘It’s better to compose than inherit’. Take a look the other things he has learned as well.

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Anthony Delgado argues that ‘JavaScript is eating the world.’ Delgado list 5 companies that are using a server-side JavaScript engine for their high traffic products. The companies included are Netflix, Paypal, Uber, IBM, and Microsoft. With each company, Delgado briefly discusses what they used before JavaScript and what the change has meant for the company.

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Mozilla Hacks deep dives Quantum CSS (aka Stylo), the super fast CSS engine coming to Firefox. QCSS parallelizes many internal calculations, and greatly speeds up the whole process. Part of the unique approach is to build out a giant matrix of CSS rules and DOM Nodes, and calculate their interdependency. Linear algebra ftw, and extra points for sweet artwork in the post.

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Android announced Andriod 8.0 Oreo. Android says the latest update brings a boot speed that is twice as fast, and it introduces background limits, picture-in-picture, and autofill. Also, most importantly, 60 new emojis.

Development Dregs

Dive Deeper - React’s Licensing Quagmire

This post was written by the DailyDrip team and syndicated via Inside.com's network of email newsletters.

[2017-08-18] [Weekly Drip 022.1] OpenAI, .NET 2.0 and Bitcoin 💖’s coal

News

alt text OpenAI has created an AI that is capable of beating the Worlds greatest Dota 2 players. The AI was put on display at the International Dota 2 tournament in a 1 v 1 match. The project started in April, and now OpenAI is working on a 5 v 5 AI to compete in Dota 2.

Microsoft released .NET Core 2.0. As of August 14th the final release is available. Microsoft also announced the release of ASP.NET Core 2.0 and Entity Framework Core 2.0. Microsoft boasts support for 6 new platforms and major runtime improvements.

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Farley Reynolds addresses some of the issues with browser compatibility on CSS Grid. Reynolds shows how some simple Sass mixins can fix most of the issues with IE and Edge and outlines other drawbacks. He concludes that even with a little inconvenience from dealing with cross-browser, CSS Grid layouts are awesome.

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I know it’s not a strait dev issue, but we as devs should think about energy usage. Que the Bitcoin Energy Consumption Index. Currently, Bitcoin alone requires as much energy as the country of Tunisia -- and the requirements are growing. Most of our energy comes from Oil and Coal, and we are burning a lot of it to power Bitcoin. If you’re interested in energy sources checkout this great book. For an opposing view, checkout Serious faults in Bitcoin Energy Consumption Index.

Development Dregs

Dive Deeper - Nifty Academics

Blog Posts this week from DailyDrip

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[2017-08-11] [Weekly Drip 021.1] DOOM, StarCraft, Unreal, AI and Teapots!

News

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Jeff Harris embedded a RESTful API into the classic 1993 game DOOM, allowing the game to be queried and controlled using HTTP and JSON. Full details in the article, of course, but essentially he slipped a C-based RESTful HTTP server into chocolate-doom, without breaking the game loop. The source is available on GitHub.

Stanford AI educator Andrew Ng announced deeplearning.ai and a new course on Deep Learning on Coursera. Andrew says these courses will help you effectively learn and apply Deep Learning, and will help you start building a career in AI. Read the full article or take a look at the course sequence. Sign up quick; the first course starts Aug. 15.

Swift 4 will no longer be accepting proposals as of Aug. 8th. Ted Kremenek of Apple said Now it is time to turn our attention to Swift 5. Ted said Swift 5 is going to focus on ABI Stability, laying the groundwork for concurrency, and refining and broadening the core of the language.

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DeepMind and Blizzard are pushing the barriers on AI research by open sourcing some awesome AI research tools. From a new Machine Learning API developed by Blizzard to a DeepMind toolset that allows easy AI integration with StarCraft II called PySC2. [ed. As someone deeply addicted to StarCraft2, I wholeheartedly support this development.]

Lukas Schörghuber decided to bid farewell to writing Go. He had some good things to say about the language including Message passing natively supported, truly fat binaries and support for BSD and Windows. However, for him the cons outweighed the pros. Cons include strict enforcement of Google code guidelines, broken package management, missing generics, and more. While you’re getting rid of Go, go ahead and dump Firebase as well.

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Unreal engine released version 4.17. New updates include sequencer improvements, global shader support for plugins, and initial support for development on Xbox One X. Read the full update or watch really cool videos showing off the new features.

Development Dregs

Dive Deeper - Regex, Tor, and Algos -- ohh my!

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Save 418

Blog Posts this week from DailyDrip

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[2017-08-04] [Weekly Drip 020.1] Interpreted Dolphin Shaders; Bitcoin Fork; DefCon attendee arrested

News

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The Dolphin emulator team solved an unbelievably difficult problem: new shaders being JIT compiled caused stuttering in games. The solution? Write an interpreter for the GameCube/Wii rendering pipeline within shaders and run it on the host graphics card. They only run the shaders on the interpreter until they’ve JIT compiled them, and it completely solved the stuttering problem. [Ed. If you’d proposed this as a solution I’d have said “it will work but you’ll never actually finish it.” Shows what I know.]

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Trail of Bits noticed that Microsoft didn’t sandbox Windows Defender, so they took matters into their own hands. Trail of Bits put it in a sandbox themselves, and open-sourced the tool they created to make it happen. The tool is called ‘Flying Sandbox Monster’ and it’s written in Rust.

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Pinterest thinks that Kotlin is at the ‘Peak of Inflated Expectations,’ and builds a case against it. Top reasons for not using Kotlin include a high learning curve, a worse build time, and static analysis. However, let’s make it clear: Pinterest uses Kotlin, and even has some helpful tips for transitioning from Java to Kotlin.

Stack Overflow will no longer accept contributions to Documentation starting August 8th. 15,451 users have contributed to Documentation, and Stack Overflow still thinks highly of the idea. However, at this point in time, there are not enough new users joining Documentation. So, Stack Overflow can’t afford to keep spending time and money on the project.

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Marcus Hutchins, who stopped ransomware’s malware from spreading in May, is being detained in the US after DefCon. Authorities arrested him for ‘allegedly creating banking malware.’ Read the full article, and read about what some other hackers did at DefCon this year.

Development Dregs

Dive Deeper - Bitcoin Fork

Blog Posts this week from DailyDrip

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[2017-07-28] [Weekly Drip 019.1] Flash is dead; Mobile worm; Ionic survey results; AI optimization

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News

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Ionic surveyed its community to find out more about what type of apps they are building. This is the first time Ionic has ever done a survey for its community, and more than 13,000 developers participated. The survey found that Hybrid dev is taking over, Firebase is on top for hosted backend services, and a lot of people are using VS Code. There are a lot of interesting finds in this article; of 13,000 respondents, 40% work for themselves and nearly half don’t track errors! Take a look at all of the results, but keep in mind that sampling bias is a thing - in a different community, the results almost certainly look wildly different.

OSS developers are angry, and not just the ‘misinterpreted pull-request comment’ kind of anger. A company called Kite is maintaining an OSS project and has made some changes to the project which many have called advertising. One of their updates was titled Implement Kite promotion. Talk about being caught red-handed.

Microsoft launched Windows Bounty Program. Qualifying vulnerabilities reported can get anywhere from $500 to $250,000. It’s a gold rush, get your monies here. Microsoft also announced the ‘end’ of Paint -- but really Paint is just joining the windows store, and yes it is free.

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🎉 Adobe announced end-of-life for Flash 🎉 They will continue to update and distribute Flash through 2020. There currently is a petition that has over 2,000 stars (signatures) to open source the Flash spec to preserve old Flash projects. The Wicked Old Witch at last is dead.

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tl;dr terrifying.

What if researchers found an exploit that could create a cross-platform worm that infected mobile phones with zero user interaction required? Just a hypothetical. In an unrelated note, "Broadpwn is a fully remote attack against Broadcom’s BCM43xx family of WiFi chipsets, which allows for code execution on the main application processor in both Android and iOS. Lengthy and fascinating writeup - if your phone is in range of an Access Point running this, they have arbitrary remote code execution. It’s not that big of a deal though - only 70% of phones surveyed in their research run this chipset.

Development Dregs

Dive Deeper - Learning AI Optimization

Blog Posts this week from DailyDrip

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[2017-07-21] [Weekly Drip 018.1] 2017-07-22 Weekly Drip: Wiping your OS while running, the myth of safe C/C++ code, and generating coastlines.

News

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Byte upgraded over 2,000 production servers in place, by installing the OS in memory, wiping the disk, and reinstalling the OS to disk. They used a script that warned Do not use this script on any system you care about. Apparently that warning was sufficient to convince them they had to try it. “It was like replacing the wheels on a moving vehicle…” [ed. I would be sweating bullets running this migration. I guess this is why I’m not a sysadmin]

Raymond Chen wants to know if people write insane code with multiple overlapping side effects with a straight face? Chen argues that ‘insane code’ is at risk of having false positives, and one should avoid blaming the compiler for being the problem. If you have no problem interpreting ‘a -= a *= a; p[x++] = ++x;’ than you probably can skip Chen’s article.

Robert O'Callahan is pretty sure no one can write C/C++ code safely. O'Callahan has a PhD in Computer Science, and was once a distinguished engineer at Mozilla where his job was to review C/C++ code. O'Callahan includes himself in this statement and confesses he ‘cannot consistently write safe C/C++ code.’

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Stack Overflow Channels is in private beta. Stack Overflow Channels aims to make a space for engineering teams to ask questions in a private environment. Channels also allows an improved way to share technical questions and answers with your whole team.

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Amit Patel from Red Blob Games is exploring procedural map generation, and shares an experiment that uses Distance Fields to describe mountains and coastlines, by allowing a designer to influence the procedural algorithm. The algorithm is simple, but the results are surprisingly good. Ultimately, he intends to use this in conjunction with other procedural generation algorithms to get better results.

Development Dregs

Dive Deeper - Machine Learning

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[2017-07-14] [Weekly Drip 017.1] [ Weekly Drip July 15th ] Discord scales with Elixir, People argue over most popular langs, and Cryptocurrency ICOs

News

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Discord has been scaling with Elixir. Now with 5 million concurrent users, CTO of Discord, Stanislav Vishnevskiy, talked about how it came to be. He also said Elixir has proven to be a great experience. The article primarily focuses on production issues they ran across and how they fixed them. The Erlang Virtual Machine and ecosystem have comically good operations tooling. Come for the concurrency and pleasant macros, stay for the 30 year legacy!

Elixir is a lot of fun to write. It’s refreshing coming from a super OO language back to a functional language that has truly pragmatic frameworks like Phoenix. Get started with our free screencast series on Elixir and Phoenix.

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JetBrains did a survey to over 5,000 developers to find out the ‘State of the Developer Ecosystem.’ They found that Java is the most popular primary language, Javascript is the most used overall, and Go was found to be the most promising. They have some extremely interesting finds like 65% of developers are gamers, and only 6% of developers get over 8 hours of sleep. Take a look at all of the results. I feel like there is a bit of a survivorship bias in this survey though. Of course JetBrain’s network is dominated by Java/python/php devs, that’s mainly what their platform is used for. If we (DailyDrip) did a survey it’d be Elixir/Elm dominating (aka Hipster Languages), judging by other sources like TIOBE the spreads are much different.

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In contrast to JetBrains, Waren Long analyzed how programming languages change over time on GitHub. Some of his findings include Python being more popular than Java, the popularity of Go remains relatively low and Perl is dying. He has some really cool graphs to visualize his findings as well.

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Graphcool made an open-source fullstack GraphQL tutorial website called ‘How to GraphQL.’ You can now quickly learn ‘How to GraphQL’ with React, Java, Elixir, and several other technologies. Take a look at the website, or the source code and install it locally.

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@BruceDawson0xB deep dives why he can’t move his mouse on a 24 core CPU. In the article, he deep dives into the trace to figure out why this is happening, ending on a bug in the serialization of processes in Windows.

Development Dregs

Dive Deeper - Cryptocurrency ICOs

In honor of Tezos raising the largest ICO in history, let’s chat about ICOs.

Blog Posts this week from DailyDrip

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[2017-07-07] [Weekly Drip 016.1] Data Structures, Old Programmers, Better Programmers, and Google Docs hacks

News

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Beau Carnes of FreeCodeCamp made 10 free videos on common data structures. Beau also included a short explanation and a link to some challenges on each data structure. Take a look at all of the videos on this youtube playlist or read the article on medium.

Josh On Design gives Five Reasons Why You Should Hire an Old Programmer. Reasons include experience (duh), communication skills, knowledge and judgement. [Commentary: We have an ageism problem in the dev world, especially with startups. If you’re expecting your development team to work >45 hours a week you’re doing it wrong -- and older devs know that! We have to stop seeing devs over the age of 30 as less desirable and outright rejecting those over the age of 40. It’s toxic and we lose many of our best minds that way.]

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Brian Steffens made a virtual machine in Google Sheets. Brian noticed some pretty nifty features of Google Docs Apps Script like running code in response to events and making a custom google sheets spreadsheet with functions for formulas. So, he decided to make a Google Sheets Virtual Machine that generated fibonacci numbers! There’s also an in-depth Code&Supply talk on doing interesting things with Google Docs.

Check out this Ask Orange Website thread on what habits make a great programmer. Top answers include staying healthy, better research tips, and continual education. Also check out Adam’s post on the same subject on the DailyDrip blog.

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Next time you need a break at work try out a block-breaking game in vim 8.0. VimGameCodeBreak is a new vim-plugin game written by John Grib. If you still need more entertainment take a look at one of his other vim-plugin games, VimGameSnake.

Development Dregs

Dive Deeper - CLI

Blog Posts this week from DailyDrip

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[2017-06-30] [Weekly Drip 015.1] One time delivery, engineering love, grow your own, and They’re good languages Brent

Blog Posts this week from DailyDrip

News

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Segment outlined how they implemented Exactly-Once Messaging. Nice architecture overview, including use of Kafka, rocksdb, and bloom filters to make it fast. Exactly-once message sends and receives aren't actually achievable, but exactly-once processing is by way of deduplication, and that's what this gets at.

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Sebastian Stadil attempted to engineer love by going on 150 dates in 4 months. He did it by automating swipes, automatic messaging and automatic date scheduling. He used A/B testing for which pictures he should use and what messages he should send. The more likes he had meant it was a better result. Yet, he ended up failing, after 150 dates he didn’t manage to find the one.

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Introducing GreenPiThumb, a Rasperry Pi gardening bot. GreenPiThumb automatically measures moisture and waters plants. It’s not perfect yet, some times resulting in killing the plants. However, some major lessons were learned including: Nothing is as simple as it seems and test hardware in isolation. Take a look at the back-end and front-end source code.

You know it’s bad when even Microsoft has a problem with TDD. As an early TDD advocate, Eric Gunnerson has some problems with TDD now that he would like to share. Eric advises instead of teaching people TDD, we should instead be spending time teaching them more about design and especially more about refactoring, because that is the important core skill. Read the full article; they suggest the pros do not outweigh the cons. Also, take a look at the conversation on the orange website. [ed. I agree with their point on refactoring but the premise is dramatically flawed]

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Brad Cypert gave a list of 5 programming languages you should try. In this order his top 5 are, Clojure, Rust, F#, Go, and Nim. Nice list Brad 😉 , we would probably add Elm and Elixir on there as well. [ed. They’re good languages, Brent.]

Development Dregs

Dive Deeper - Machine Learning

[2017-06-23] [Weekly Drip 014.1] Tabs vs. Spaces redux; Interviews are terrible; OSS deep-learning data

Blog Posts this week on DailyDrip

News

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Last week you stopped using tabs because Stack Overflow said you wouldn’t make as much money. Turns out this was not exactly true: correlation does not imply causation. Thanks for the detailed data science analysis by Evelina Gabasova that gave some more insight to the Tabs vs. Spaces data. Evelina found that Open Source contributors make more money than those who don’t contribute to OSS, and that was a significant cause of the disparity as OSS devs prefer spaces over tabs. Additionally, she found that developers who use git make more money at all levels of experience.

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DeepMind put together a list of massive Open Source datasets. The first open source database mentioned is Kinetics, ‘A large-scale, high-quality dataset of URL links to approximately 300,000 video clips that covers 400 human action classes.’ Other datasets include DSprites, Collectible Card Game to Code, and Unsupervised Data Generated for GeoQuery and SAIL. Take a look at all of the Datasets.

The GCC Steering Committee has decided to include the D Language in GCC and has appointed a maintainer. The patch must still acquire approval from a global reviewer. However, David Edelson made the announcement on Wednesday that it would happen.

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Jose Aguinaga asked the question ‘What if companies interviewed translators the way they interview coders?’ Jose makes up what would be ridiculous questions for a translator that programmers can relate to. The analogy might not be perfect though, as pointed out by Gayle McDowell (Author of Cracking the Coding Interview) in a comment at the end of the article.

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GitLab released version 9.3. It’s just a product release announcement, but it’s crazy cool. New features include Code Quality and Multi-Project Pipeline Graphs. Read the full announcement or watch a demo. [Ed. - things like this can make GitHub compete on features other than the color of the navigation bar!]

Development Dregs

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Dive Deeper - Flexbox

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[2017-06-16] [Weekly Drip 013.1] Tabs cost you money, Mac Ransomware, and G’MIC is more awesome

Blog Posts this week from DailyDrip

News

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Greyc’s Magic for Image Computing(G’MIC) released version 2.0. G’MIC is an OSS framework that helps with retouching images and creating graphics. New features include a more versatile interface, colorimetric transformations, masking color, and ease of use. The smart coloring features look really interesting, and as APIs get wrapped around them they should be a real boon for devs who deal with images a lot.

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Fortinet analyzed the new OS X-focused MacRansom, which offers to build custom targeted ransomware payloads as a service. They confirm that it is a functional ransomware, though not as sophisticated as most Windows-based alternatives. Additionally, they are skeptical that the author is even capable of decrypting the files after payment. Intriguing analysis in the article.

Itamar Turner-Trauring made a list of bad naming schemes to help you avoid potential software naming conflicts. The top three tips were to not name a project after a metal band, not to pick a name that will allow people to make bad jokes about you, and not to pick an extended metaphor unless it makes sense. Itamar has a story behind every reason. Check out all the reasons and stories.

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Dexter Yang created a ‘A Big Picture, Thesaurus, and Taxonomy of Modern JavaScript Web Development’, and it is huge. It currently contains over 2000 links. Dexter said I hope this document can help one developer to have more power to do much more and much better, just like a spellbook does in fantasy worlds.

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Stack Overflow did a survey to find out if developers use tabs or spaces more. The results found that more developers use spaces, and developers who use spaces instead of tabs make more money. Read more on Stack Overflow’s blog. [Editor: Interesting that those who use both make the least. Makes sense, because I would (╯°□°)╯︵ ┻━┻]

Development Dregs

Dive Deeper - Learn you some Unix

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[2017-06-09] [Weekly Drip 012.1] R analysis of HN trends, WWDC, and TempleOS gets a Gameboy Emulator

News

Graph showing trending words on HN

David Robinson used R to analyze the last 1 million hacker news posts. His objective was to find the most common words used in titles and the way they changed over time. He found that hn was used most, and “google” was used second most. Other words in the top 10 included data, app, web, startup and video. Take a look at all of his results.

OSS Graph

GitHub’s Open Source Survey results were released this week. The goal of the survey was to get data on OSS practices and communities. With over 5,500 responses, everyone highly values good documentation. What a surprise. 93% of respondents said incomplete or outdated documentation is often a problem. Still, *nearly 60% said they don’t contribute to documentation. *

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Ozan Onay lays out a very compelling case for avoiding hype in technological decisions - You Are Not Google! Among his points: Amazon didn’t switch to Service-Oriented Architecture until they had around 7,800 employees and over $3.1B in sales. His framework for deciding what technologies to use: Understand the problem; Enumerate multiple candidate solutions; Read a paper; Identify the historical context behind a candidate; Weigh advantages against disadvantages; and Think!

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Alec Murphy made a Game Boy emulator for TempleOS. The emulator is a WIP, but it is an impressive/funny accomplishment -- no matter your feelings on TempleOS and its creator.

Development Dregs

Dive Deeper - WWDC

Conference Videos

There were two great conferences this week that are dear to our hearts:

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[2017-06-02] [Weekly Drip 011.1] Apple Teaches Swift, Node 8.0, Fireflies capture everyone’s attention, and CS degrees are rare.

News

Swift Book Cover

Apple released a 900 page book on Swift. Targeted at beginning programmers, App Development with Swift walks one through everything they need to know to get started with the great Swift programming language. The book includes video tutorials and has strong early reviews.

iOS GUI screenshot

Neural Networks are generating code from screenshots of the UI you want. Pix2Code is a paper showing the state of the art in converting an image of a User Interface into working code. They use 3 Neural Networks to infer the meaning of the image. No code is yet provided by the author.

Node.js released version 8.0. Featuring async_hooks, zero-filling buffers, and major improvements for debugging. The Node.js API is now available behind a flag, which will lead to a future in which native modules don’t break with each release. Read the announcement on medium or on their blog post.

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Nicky Case made an interactive tribute to Fireflies. Scroll through the project to learn more about how fireflies coordinate with each other. This was a hit on hackernews and don’t forget to look at the source code to see how she did it.

Graph showing US Bachelor's degrees, growth by field of study

Dan Wang has 11 reasons why people aren’t majoring in Computer Science. The first being, Computer Science is hard. The author buries the lead that most CS degrees are out of date before you start them, let alone when you graduate. Other top reasons include not needing a CS degree to be a developer, and people not being market-driven when considering a major in college.

Development Dregs

Dive Deeper - WebAssembly

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[2017-05-26] [Weekly Drip 010.1] Stack Overflow uses Machine Learning to make better job postings, GitHub Marketplace, and One Million developers are stuck in Vim

News

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Stack Overflow steals the top spot again with their deep dive on Machine Learning and the R language for making better job posting recommendations. Through a series of iterations, Aurélien Gasser walks us through the disappointing release and iterations that lead to massive success for their job recommendation engine.

GitHub Marketplace, a new way to discover dev tools, is live. More than a dozen apps have already been integrated to GitHub Marketplace including Travis Cl, Waffle, and Zenhub. GitHub also introduced the GitHub GraphQL API. Read more about these updates on GitHub’s blog.

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One million developers have checked Stack Overflow for help with exiting Vim. In honor of the milestone, Stack Overflow showed some data behind the question. Developers in Ukraine have had the most trouble exiting Vim, making up almost 7% of the total visits to the original question (How to exit the Vim editor?).

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Unreal Engine released version 4.16. Some of the updates include new animation features, significant performance improvements, and a lot of quality enhancements. Unreal Engine announced support for the Nintendo Switch, and 160 other improvements with the new version. Read the full announcement.

IBM, Google, and Lyft team up to launch Istio, a platform for microservice management. Istio’s features include intelligent routing, load balancing, cross-platform resilience, and in-depth telemetry. Read more on IBM’s blog or Istio’s home page.

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Microsoft introduced a new programming language, P. The language was developed to address the challenges of asynchronous computation, while providing fault-tolerance. The P programming model is based on concurrently executing state machines communicating via events, with each event accompanied by a typed payload value. Read more about P on Microsoft's blog, practice with the P manual, or look through the source code.

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Twilio Functions, a serverless environment to build and run applications, is now in Public Beta. Now you can use Twilio without messing with servers. The first 10,000 invocations are free, and after that each cost $0.0001. Read more on Twilio’s blog.

Development Dregs

Dive Deeper - Let’s ‘Go’ Crazy!

50/50: Board game || programming language

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[2017-05-19] [Weekly Drip 009.1] Google I/O takes over, Kotlin becomes first-class, and data behind the repetitiveness of top songs

News

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Google I/O conference was this week. Google announced a standalone version of the Daydream View VR headset, Android O beta, and a ton of other stuff including a super sweet AI chip. Take a glance at the schedule or scroll through TechCrunch’s coverage of the conference.

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Colin Morris used Lempel-Ziv algorithm, to analyze the repetitiveness of the top 100 hot songs between 1958-2017. The most repetitive song was ‘Around The World’ by Daft Punk. Take a look at the rest of the data found on ThePudding blog.

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Kotlin is now officially a first-class language for Android. Google made the announcement this week at Google I/O. Android Studio 3.0 will include support for Kotlin. Read more about Kotlin on Android, read the VentureBeat article, or watch the round of applause after the announcement.

Heroku CI is now generally available. It’s a fast, low-setup CI that is integrated with Heroku Pipelines. Features include increased power, speed, and flexibility. Heroku says it is cost-effective and enterprise-ready. Read more about the update on Heroku’s blog.

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There is a ton more stuff on Google I/O. Google is making a crazy job search engine and wants everyone to have access to AI. Also, Chrome is coming to VR. Don’t forget the LCD Soundsystem concert that was streamed live Thursday night. Go see what you missed! Day 1, Day 2, Day 3.

Development Dregs

Dive Deeper - Kotlin

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[2017-05-12] [Weekly Drip 008.1] GPL Ruled Enforceable, New MS Design System, and Stack Overflow Trends

News

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Stack Overflow Trends is a new tool to track interest in programming languages. Developers ask 8,000 questions a day on average, so Stack Overflow Trends can help sort through what technologies are most popular. You can also compare technologies popularity based on the amount of questions asked about it with the new tool. Read more about the tool on Stack Overflow’s blog or try out the tool.

US District court rules GPL an enforceable contract. Hancom Office included Ghostscript, a PDF interpreter by Artifex in their suite. They did not open source their software or pay Artifex a license fee for the interpreter. Judge Corley ruled that by using the software they had agreed to the GPL.

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Microsoft Fluent Design System announced as the new Windows look and feel. The new design system will be leveraged across all platforms. The transition to MFDS will not happen immediately. The first elements will come with the fall Creators Update with the rest rolling out after that. The design system proposes five interactive pillars -- light, depth, motion, material, and scale -- that are both minimalistic and draw the user’s attention to the proper element at the proper time.

Google open-sourced SyntaxNet. SyntaxNet is self-proclaimed as the world’s most accurate syntactic parser. The tool is a neural network framework that lays a foundation for Natural Language Understanding. Read more about SyntaxNet or take a look at the source code.

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MapD open-sourced its GPU-powered database. MapD allows a single server with multiple GPUs to perform sub-second queries across billions of records. Along with the database, MapD visualisation libraries were also open-sourced. Take a look at one of the more popular visualization libraries dc.js or go chat it up on the new MapD community forum.

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DailyDrip has produced five weeks of free content to introduce people to the Elixir programming language and prepare them for building web applications using Ecto and Phoenix. Take a look at all the free Elixir content.

Development Dregs

Deep Dive - Random CSS Sweetness

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[2017-05-05] [Weekly Drip 007.1] deck.gl, music sequencing, an Intel chipset vulnerability, and more.

News

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Uber open sourced deck.gl, a WebGL framework for large datasets. Features include a layered approach to data visualisation, high-precision computations in the GPU, and React integration. Take a look at the source code or see an example.

Helio Workstation is a new open source music sequencer that is compatible with all major platforms on desktop and mobile. Helio Workstation features include a high-performance core (written in C++), clean interface, and version control. Watch a demo of Helio Workstation or take a look at the source code.

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Sizzy, a tool to help develop responsive websites, is now live. Sizzy allows you to view a website in multiple screen sizes at the same time. Simply type a URL into the input box on Sizzy’s home page, and you’re good to go. Checkout the source code or try this example.

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Introducing the Ultimate Android Reference. It bills itself as Your Road To Become a Better Android Developer. The project aims to showcase well-tested resources that will help Android developers; there’s a lot of resources of questionable quality out there, so some curation is appreciated. Take a look at the Github repo to learn more.

A security exploit was discovered in intel platforms created since 2008. Intel’s advisory said, An unprivileged local attacker could provision manageability features gaining unprivileged network or local system privileges. It only affects you if you have Active Management Technology enabled, so they say most consumers are unaffected. Still, it’s a big deal. Read the full advisory or the writeup on Hackaday.

Development Dregs

Dive Deeper - ( Basecamp & Kotlin )

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[2017-04-28] [Weekly Drip 006.1] RailsConf, Web Dev Roadmap, Stanford teaches JS over Java

News

Rails Conf Logo

RailsConf was this week, and Rails 5.1 was pushed. The new version of Rails includes yarn/webpack, system tests, easier integration testing, and encrypted secrets. You can catch up on the talks on youtube with the streams from Wednesday and Thursday. See the full schedule here.

Web Developer Graph

freeCodeCamp put together a crazy roadmap to becoming a web developer in 2017. It details many skills and the order in which to learn them. There are so many moving parts in modern web development, it can be very overwhelming to figure out where to start.

At Stanford CS department, Java is out, and Javascript is in. A recent poll of SIGCSE-Members shows Java is currently used 84 times in intro CS classes, which leads all other languages. Python is used second most, and C++ is third. Read more about the transition or take a look at the full results of the poll.

Image of Postal in action

Postal is a new open source mail server tool that competes with Sendgrid, Mailgun, and Postmark. Since it is OSS, Postal is ready to run on your own servers. It handles both incoming and outgoing emails, provides web hooks for them, and handles spam filtering. Check out all the features on their wiki.

Python doesn't have to be slow. Using Async Python plus Redis can be a very powerful system for rendering pages quickly. Paxos built a library called subconscious that provides database-like features on top of an in-memory redis store. The Python uvloop package is a fantastic tool to deal with async io in Python - at least 2x faster than gevent or node’s event loop. It turns out that storing and retrieving from RAM is fast -- who knew?

image of React Sketchapp in action

AirBnb open sourced their new design tool react-sketchapp. react-sketchapp bridges the gap between engineers and designers by using React components to render Sketch documents. Jon Gold describes the new tool as ‘Painting with Code.’ Read more about it on AirBnb’s blog or see it action on the react-sketchapp github repo.

A bug in GCC could cause memory leaks in C++ programs. The bug is potentially harmful in GCC 4, 5, and 6. The bug has been detailed on Andrzej’s C++ blog. Read the bug report or watch an example of how the bug works.

The Crystal core-team is hosting an in-depth Codecamp in San Francisco May 11-12. They are covering the basics of the language, concurrency, and more advanced issues like compilers and web frameworks. Check out the basics of Crystal Lang, a Ruby-inspired typechecked systems programming language.

Development Dregs

Dive Deeper - Go

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[2017-04-21] [Weekly Drip 005.1] React Changes, Docker OSS rebrands as Moby, and Weed NLP

News

Facebook rewrites React and announces Fiber a more extensible, customizable, and modern version of React. Fiber is fully backwards compatible and more componentized and adds support for incremental rendering. Check out their write-up of the architecture. Facebook also released Relay Modern, a framework for building data-driven application with GraphQL and launched react-vr.

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Docker’s founder: Docker is transitioning all of its open source collaborations to the Moby project going forward. The Moby project aims to allow more customization than previous docker systems. It accomplishes this by ensuring most components are swappable. Read more about Moby Project on Docker’s blog or the new Moby Project website. Also, take a look at docker’s new toolkit for building linux subsystems, linuxkit.

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In honor of 4/20, Sara Robinson made an NLP analysis of how people talk about cannabis on Reddit. Impressions were generally positive, but people spent a lot of time talking about the political situation surrounding marijuana. Check out part of her process here.

AWS announced a new cloud service CodeStar. AWS Codestar helps developers quickly develop, build and deploys applications. The goal of the new service is to allow developers to quickly produce quality applications that meet customers needs while maintaining an agile software development workflow. Read more about AWS CodeStar or take a look at the getting started guide.

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The Deepmind team published a paper in Nature covering Hybrid computing using a neural network with dynamic external memory. This sounds complicated because it is. They were able to achieve a 3.8% error rate on a complex natural language processing test, where the previous best result was a 7.5% error rate. Also they showed that DNCs can solve complex tasks that normal Neural Networks cannot. Checkout the full code on github.

The next release of Atom should launch in half the time. The interesting part is how they used V8 snapshots to improve the load time. Checkout the well written and detailed article on Improving Atom Startup Time.

Stackoverflow Graph

Go ahead and take the weekend off. You won’t be alone as StackOverflow users are less active on Friday afternoon, Saturday and Sunday. Data indicates C programmers work late, as the majority of late night questions have been centered on C. David Robinson details more on StackOverflow’s blog.

Development Dregs

Dive Deeper - Microsoft Edge Development Progress

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[2017-04-14] [Weekly Drip 004.1] Rate Limiting, ReactXP Announced, and criticism of Electron/Slack resource management

News

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In An Alternative Approach to Rate Limiting Nikrad Mahdi considers three different existing rate limiting algorithms -- Token Bucket, Fixed Window Counters, and Sliding Window Log -- before settling on combining the last two to create his custom Sliding Window Counters approach. It’s a case study on a practical solution to a real spam problem.

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ReactXP is now open source. ReactXP builds on popular React frameworks to offer cross-platform apps for web, Android, iOS, and Windows. Read more about the future and history of ReactXP on their blog, and watch React Native Training’s first look at ReactXP on Youtube. Also, React released version 15.5.0.

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Is Electron the new flash? Electron is a toolkit that allows you to build cross platform applications in html/css/js. Slack, an electron app, takes up 160 megs on the desktop, rather large for a text-chat service in 2017. Joseph Gentle says that even when slack is idle, it is often at 5% CPU usage. Dave Cheney chimes in with more criticism of Slack, calling it detrimental to open source projects.

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Freenode has officially become part of PIA (Private Internet Access). Freenode has been supported by PIA for the last couple years, but on April 12, Freenode announced they will become part of the PIA family. Freenode has provided services to open source software and other projects for the last 18 years. Freenode will continue to operate as a non-profit, though will now be legally owned by PIA. PIA is a VPN service that provides privacy protection by giving you an anonymous IP.

Prettier is a javascript source code beautifier that uses your code’s AST to provide features that other beautifiers can’t. Prettier has released version 1.0 and has over 100,000 npm downloads monthly. Check out the announcement for Prettier 1.0 and watch it in action.

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Intel Labs has open sourced the Haskell Research Compiler. Haskell is a functional programming language that is statically typed and purely functional. You can read more about the Haskell Research Compiler or learn about how it fits in ‘The Functional Language Research Compiler’ by looking at it’s documentation. Intel Labs is not actively working on this project at the moment.

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Vitaly Slobodin has stepped down from maintaining PhantomJS. Slobodin tweeted an update that PhantomJS 2.5 will not be released and announced he does not see a future for PhantomJS. You can read the announcement. He cites the announcement of Chrome’s Headless Mode as a inevitable replacement to PhantomJS.

Development Dregs

Deep Dive: Crazy Text Editor Tricks

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[2017-04-08] [Weekly Drip 003.1] Apple commits to Pro users, Android beats Windows in internet usage, and VR’s new backbone is here.

News

Hackers have earned almost half a million dollars by finding vulnerabilities in MRuby via Shopify’s bug-bounty. Original payout was $20,000 for issues that compromised Shopify’s infrastructure, but all bounties dropped 90% after a large number of bugs were reported. A total of 131 bug reports have been submitted to date. Daniel Bovensiepen detailed the pros and cons of the bounty.

Brian Anderson, a core member of The Rust Team, knows a thing or two about maintaining OSS. Anderson said he doesn’t always follow his own guidelines, but presents tips on communication: 1. Respond quickly, 2. Give thanks, and 3. Pay a compliment. A quick response to a pull request, and a thank you afterwards will make some one who contributed to your project feel appreciated. If you are interested in being a ‘Minimally-nice Open Source Software Maintainer,’ take a look at the rest of his tips.

New iMacs are on track to ship this year, and immediate upgrades are coming to existing Mac Pros. Next-gen Mac Pros are on the way… Next year. Well, hopefully next year, according to John Gruber.

Jupyter Notebook has released version 5.0. New updates include the ability to sort files in the dashboard, cell tagging and a more appealing table style (new table style shown below). Also, customizing keyboard shortcuts is no longer a hassle, and you can easily update them in command mode. Read more about the release on Jupyter Notebook’s blog.

Idris has released version 1.0. The language is now stable. Primarily used in research, Idris is a functional programming language with dependent types. To learn more, read the documentation on Idris or go through a tutorial.

In the last five years, Windows dropped from 80% of the internet market usage, to 37.91%. In the same amount of time, Android has seen a climb from less than 5% to 37.93%. For the first time ever, Android beat out Windows in internet usage.

VR is in search of a backbone, and Matrix may be the answer. Matrix is used with the matrix-js-sdk to connect apps using WebVR on voip calls, video calls and instant messaging. You can see a video demo of the features or run the demo on your VR device. Also, take a look at the github repo used during the demo. Read more about Matrix and the latest demo by taking a look at Matthew Hodgson’s blog post.

Development Dregs

2017 Front-end Dive Deep

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[2017-04-01] [Weekly Drip 002.1] 2017.04.01 Ember had a big week, Next.js 2.0 is here, and 99 Bottles of OOP is ready to be on your reading list.

News

Ember had a big week, announcing its fast new rendering engine, Glimmer features ‘Fast and light-weight UI components for the web.’ Also, EmberConf was this week, you can stream them on YouTube here: day 1 and day 2.

Android Studio support is coming to ChromeOS. A bug report publicly showed Google working on Android integrated development. To read more about what this could mean for Android native testing take a look here.

Paul Weeks took IBM Watson to a whole new level this week. He used IBM Bluemix Watson APIs to improve his resume. If you want to enhance your resume as well, take a look at how he did it. You can also practice your technical AI skills by making a simple chess AI or a language translator.

Next.js, a slim framework built on top of React, has released version 2.0. New features include dynamic routing, component CSS support, and pre-fetching. For a brief introduction to Next.js, take a look at this tutorial.

Curl turned 19 years old. Happy Birthday Curl! Still, after 19 years, some suggest curl should be rewritten in a different language. However, Daniel Stenberg argues that Curl is C, and points out that C is not the root for most past vulnerabilities.

Jessie Frazelle wants you to know that Linux namespaces and cgroups are not containers. Even if you don’t have particular thoughts about Solaris Zones or BSD Jails, take a look at Frazelle’s thoughts on containers. If you want to learn more about containers start with this comic.

99 Bottles of OOP, covering Object Oriented Programming and written by Sandi Metz & Katrina Owen is now available. At nearly 70,000 words, 99 Bottles of OOP was written to explain how to write good code in a practical way. To hear more about how the book came to be, listen to this podcast. Also, read a sample of the book here.

C++ 17 is finished. Most features have been finished for quite some time. However, the ISO C++ committee met in early March and put the finishing touches on C++17. As soon as this summer, C++20 will be on the agenda. Read more about what is next for C++ here.

Development Dregs

Deep Dive - Long Live C

New This Week on the Distillery

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